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Author Topic: Progressions: for the classically trained pianist  (Read 3543 times)

Offline T-Block

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Progressions: for the classically trained pianist
« on: May 21, 2008, 06:19:28 AM »
I've recently been presented with an idea of how to teach gospel music to people who have been classically trained.  I hear that a lot of classically trained musicians can play the by the notes well, but can't play by ear.  They even know theory, but are lost when the notes aren't in front of them.

Well, I'm hoping this post (and others like it) will help you classically trained pianists out there learn how to play by ear using terms that you are/should be familiar with.  This first post is going to be the progressions I already posted.  Only this time, I'm going to use Roman Numerals instead of numbers.

BASIC PROGRESSIONS

Since you are classically trained, then u should already know what a progression is.  Here's a little reminder:

A progression is simply a group of 2 or more chords.  Each chord u play leads, or progresses, to the next chord.  The ultimate goal is to get back to the 1 chord of the key u in.  Progressions get their name from the bass / left hand notes u play.  This is based off the circle of 4ths, which is the circle of 5ths in reverse.  Here are the progressions that are used the most in gospel music.  I'll put them in the key of C:

First, the members of C:
C=I   D=ii   E=iii   F=IV   G=V   A=vi   B=vii


I-V-1

This progression is usually found at the end of a song.  As u are playing this, once u play the V, u should feel a strong urge play the I:

C / C-E-G (I)    C / C-E-G (I)     C / E-G-C (I)     C / G-C-E (I)
G / G-B-D (V)   G / B-D-G (V)     G / D-G-B (V)    G / G-B-D (V)
(repeat)            (repeat)             (repeat)           (repeat)


I-V7-I progression

This is just a little variation of the I-V-I progression.  By adding in the minor 7th, it creates an even stronger urge to go to I.  Now, u don't add the 7th of the key u in, u add the 7th of the chord.  The correct term for the V7 chord is the dominant 7th chord:

C / C-E-G (I)         C / C-E-G (I)           C / E-G-C (I)
G / G-B-D-F (V7)    G / B-D-F-G (V7)     G / D-F-G-B (V7)
(repeat)                  (repeat)                  (repeat)

C / G-C-E (I)          C / G-C-E (I)
G / F-G-B-D (V7)     G / G-B-D-F (V7)
(repeat)                    (repeat)


I-IV-I progression

This progression is also called the "Amen" progression:

C / C-E-G (I)     C / C-E-G (I)       C / E-G-C (I)       C / G-C-E (I)
F / F-A-C (IV)    F / C-F-A (IV)     F / F-A-C (IV)      F / A-C-F (IV)
(repeat)              (repeat)             (repeat)             (repeat)


I-IV-V progression

This is the most basic progression that can be used to play a whole song.  A lot of the hymns follow this progression:

C / C-E-G (I)       C / C-E-G (I)       C / E-G-C (I)      C / G-C-E (I)
F / F-A-C (IV)      F / C-F-A (IV)     F / F-A-C (IV)     F / A-C-F (IV)
G / G-B-D (V)       G / B-D-G (V)      G / D-G-B (V)     G / G-B-D (V)
(repeat)                (repeat)              (repeat)             (repeat)


I-IV-V7 progression

This is a variation of the I-IV-V progression.  Instead of playing a regular V chord, you can play a V7 chord:

C / C-E-G (I)        C / C-E-G (I)          C / E-G-C (I)
F / F-A-C (IV)       F / C-F-A (IV)        F / F-A-C (IV)
G / G-B-D-F (V7)   G / B-D-F-G (V7)    G / D-F-G-B (V7) 
(repeat)                  (repeat)               (repeat)

C / G-C-E (I)         C / G-C-E (I)
F / A-C-F (IV)        F / A-C-F (IV)
G / G-B-D-F (V7)    G / F-G-B-D (V7)
(repeat)                   (repeat)


Dominant 7th chord to IV (of the chord)

Whenever u have any kind of major chord, you can add the minor 7th of that chord.  Once u do that, it becomes a dominant 7th chord.  It naturally wants to go to IV of the chord.  Key does not matter here:

C / C-E-G-Bb            C / C-E-G-Bb           C / E-G-Bb-C 
F / F-A-C (IV of C)    F / C-F-A (IV of C)    F / F-A-C (IV of C)   
(repeat)                     (repeat)                   (repeat)

C / G-Bb-C-E           C / Bb-C-E-G
F / A-C-F (IV of C)    F / A-C-F (IV of C)
(repeat)                    (repeat)


vii-iii-vi progression

This is a progression that by itself doesn't mean much.  But, when u add other progressions to it, it sounds really good:

B / B-D-F (vii)     B / B-D-F (vii)      B / B-D-F (vii)
E / E-G-B (iii)      E / G-B-E (iii)       E / B-E-G (iii)
A / A-C-E (vi)     A / A-C-E (vi)      A / C-E-A (vi)
(repeat)               (repeat)              (repeat)

B / D-F-B (vii)     B / F-B-D (vii)
E / E-G-B (iii)      E / G-B-E (iii)
A / E-A-C (vi)     A / A-C-E (vi)
(repeat)               (repeat)


ii-V-i progression

This progression can be used instead of the I-IV-V progression.  Sort of like a substitute progression.  I like this one better than I-IV-V cuz it sounds better to me:

D / D-F-A (ii)     D / A-D-F (ii)      D / D-F-A (ii)      D / F-A-D (ii)
G / G-B-D (V)    G / B-D-G (V)      G / D-G-B (V)     G / G-B-D (V)
C / C-E-G (I)     C / C-E-G (I)       C / E-G-C (I)      C / G-C-E (I)
(repeat)              (repeat)              (repeat)            (repeat)


iii-vi-ii-V-I progression

This progression is the musical ZIP CODE.  If you want your chords to flow smoothly and naturally from chord to chord, follow this pattern as much as possible:

E / E-G-B (iii)      E / G-B-E (iii)       E / B-E-G (iii)     E / E-G-B (iii)
A / A-C-E (vi)     A / A-C-E (vi)      A / C-E-A (vi)     A / E-A-C (vi)
D / D-F-A (ii)      D / A-D-F (ii)       D / D-F-A (ii)      D / F-A-D (ii)
G / G-B-D (V)     G / B-D-G (V)       G / D-G-B (V)     G / G-B-D (V)
C / C-E-G (I)      C / C-E-G (I)        C / E-G-C (I)      C / G-C-E (I)
(repeat)               (repeat)              (repeat)             (repeat)


vii-iii-vi-ii-V-I progression

As you can see from the name, it just combines all of the progressions above into one big progression:

B / B-D-F (vii)     B / B-D-F (vii)      B / B-D-F (vii)
E / E-G-B (iii)      E / G-B-E (iii)       E / B-E-G (iii)
A / A-C-E (vi)     A / A-C-E (vi)      A / C-E-A (vi)
D / D-F-A (ii)      D / A-D-F (ii)       D / D-F-A (ii)
G / G-B-D (V)     G / B-D-G (V)       G / D-G-B (V)
C / C-E-G (I)      C / C-E-G (I)        C / E-G-C (I)
(repeat)               (repeat)              (repeat)

B / D-F-B (vii)      B / F-B-D (vii)
E / E-G-B (iii)      E / G-B-E (iii)
A / E-A-C (vi)     A / A-C-E (vi)
D / F-A-D (ii)      D / A-D-F (ii)
G / G-B-D (V)     G / B-D-G (V)
C / G-C-E (I)      C / C-E-G (I)
(repeat)               (repeat)


These are the basic progressions you should already know from theory class.  This is just another way of presenting the information w/out using sheet music notes.  Pay attention to how each one sounds.  The 1st set of chords in each progression list uses the chords in root position.  The other sets use the chords in all the inversions so that you can flow smoothly from chord to chord.
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Offline T-Block

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Re: Progressions: for the classically trained pianist
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2008, 07:53:20 AM »
The progressions you see hear are the ones you will hear in gospel music today.  They have been modified from the basic ones to include even more inversions and more altered (non-diatonic) chords.  Again, I'll use Roman Numberals to explain them.  On a side note, my theory is a little rusty, so if I make a mistake(s) feel free to correct me:

MORE ADVANCED PROGRESSIONS (part one)

vii-iii-vi progressions

B / A-D-F *(vii7)            B / A-D-F (vii7)           B / F-A-D (vii7)         
E / Ab-C-D-G **(III7)     E / Ab-B-D-F (III7)      E / F-Ab-B-D (III7)
A / G-C-E ***(vi7)         A / G-C-E (vi7)           A / E-A-C (vi7)
(repeat)                            (repeat)                     (repeat)

*This chord adds the 7th to the basic vii chord.

**This chord is a secondary dominant chord.  So, the more familiar term for this chord is V of vi, or in this case V7 of vi.

***This is the resolution chord for the sec. dom. above with the added 7th.


B / F#-A-C#-E (vii)   *this chord is an incomplete minor 11th chord, the 3rd is missing
E / Ab-C-D-G (III7)
A / G-C-E (vi7)
(repeat)


ii-V-1 progressions

D / F#-A-C-E (II 9)   *this is another secondary dominant chord, here it is V9 of V
G / F-G-C-D (V7 sus4)                       
G / F-G-B-D (V7)                             
C / E-G-C (I)                       
(repeat)                   

D / Ab-C-D-F (ii7 -5)  *this is a minor 7th chord built on ii, the fifth has been lowered
G / G-C-E (I 6/4)  *this starts the famous I 6/4 - V - I cadence
G / F-G-C-D (V sus4)
G / F-G-B-D (V7)
C / E-G-C (I)                                 
(repeat)                           


D / F#-A-C-D# (II7 -9)  *this is another secondary dominant chord, the b9 has been added, V7 of V
G / F-A-B-D# (V9 +5)  OR  G / F-G-B-D# (V7 +5)  *in each of these chords, the 5th has been raised
C / Bb-E-A-C (I13)  OR  C / Bb-E-G-C (I7)
(repeat)


ii-iii-IV-V-I progression

D / Ab-C-D-F (ii7 -5)
E / G-C-E (I6)
F / Ab-C-D-F (ii6/5 -5)
G / G-C-E (I 6/4)
G / F-G-C-D (V sus4)
G / F-G-B-D (V7)
C / E-G-C (I)
(repeat)


7-3-6-2-5-1 progression

B / A-D-F (vii7)         
E / Ab-C-D-G (III7)
A / G-C-E (vi7)         
D / Ab-C-D-F (ii7 -5)
G / G-C-E (I 6/4)                 
G / F-G-C-D (V sus4)
G / F-G-B-D (V7)
C / E-G-C (I)
(repeat)


7-3-6-2-3-4-5-1 progression

B / A-D-F (vii7)         
E / Ab-C-D-G (III7)
A / G-C-E (vi7)         
D / Ab-C-D-F (ii7 -5)
E / G-C-E (I6)
F / Ab-C-D-F (ii6/5 -5)
G / G-C-E (I 6/4)
G / F-G-C-D (V sus4)
G / F-G-B-D (V7)
C / E-G-C (I)
(repeat)


vi-ii-V-I progressions

A / G-C-E (vi7)                         
D / F#-C-E (II9)  *secondary dominant, V9 of V, 5th is ommitted
G / F-Bb-D (v7)  *instead of the expected V7 there is an v7
C / E-Bb-D (I9)  *secondary dominant, V9 of IV, 5th is ommitted
(repeat)

The key to the above progression is there is a slight modulation to the sub-dominant.  So, it's almost like doing a iii-vi-ii-V-I in F, but staying in the key of C.  The use of those secondary dominant chords helps to reiterate that principle.  This is going to apply to the rest of the progressions in this set.


A / G-C-E (vii7)
D / F#-A-C-E (II9)
G / F-Bb-D (v7)
C / E-G-Bb-D (I9)
(repeat)

The above progression is just a variation of the first progression.  This time, all the notes are present in the secondary dominant 9th chords.


A / G-C-E (vi7)
D / F#-B-D# (?)
G / F-Bb-D (v7)
C / E-A-C# (?)
(repeat)

I'm not quite sure yet how to explain this one in classical terms.  All I can say is the RH chords are moving downward chromatically while the LH does the normal vi-ii-V-I movement.


A / G-B-C-E (ii9)                 
D / F#-B-C-E (II9/13)  *the 13th degree has been added to the sec. dom. 9th chord
G / F-A-Bb-D (v9)             
C / E-A-Bb-D (I9/13)  *again the 13th degree has been added to the sec. dom. 9th chord
(repeat)                   


A / G-B-C-E (vi9)
D / F#-A-C-E (II9)
G / F-A-Bb-D (v9)
C / E-G-Bb-D (I9)
(repeat)

This is a unique progression in this set because all of these chords are 9th chords.


vi-#V-V-I progressions

A / G-C-E (vi7)
G# / F#-B-D# (#v7)
G / F-Bb-D (v7)
C / E-Bb-D (I7)
(repeat)

In this set of progressions, we will be doing a chromatic walk-down.  For the first 3 chords, both hands move down by 1/2 steps.  For the last chord, the LH goes to I.  In the RH chord, only one note moves down 1/2 step, forming the dominant 7th chord.  This is that slight modulation to the sub-dominant principle we encountered ealier.

A / G-C-E (vi7)
G# / F#-B-D# (#v7)
G / F-Bb-D (v7)
C / E-A-C# (?)
(repeat)

Here, all the RH chords move down by 1/2 steps.  The first 3 LH notes move down 1/2 step, then it goes to I for the last chord.

A / G-B-C-E (vi9)
G# / F#-A#-B-D# (#v9)
G / F-Bb-D (v7)
C / E-Bb-D (I9)
(repeat)

Here, the LH still moves the same as before, but now there is a mixture of 7th and 9th chords.


vi-ii-V-I-IV progression

A / G-C-E (vi7)           
D / F#-C-E (II9)     
G / Bb-D-F-A (v9)  *this is a great color chord
C / Bb-D-E-G (I9)
F / A-C-E-G (IVM9)  *this is a diatonic 9th chord built on IV
(repeat)

Again, this progression indicates a slight modulation to the sub-dominant like we did earlier.  Only this time the resolution chord is present.
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Offline T-Block

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Re: Progressions: for the classically trained pianist
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2008, 08:00:50 AM »
More Advanced Progressions (part two)

ii-I-bVII-bVI-V progression

D / C-F-A (ii)
C / D-G-B (I)
Bb / Eb-Ab-C (bVII)
Ab / F-Bb-D (bVI)
G / G-C-E (V)
(repeat)                     

D / F-A-C (ii)
C / G-B-D (I)
Bb / Ab-C-Eb (bVII)
Ab / Bb-D-F (bVI)
G / C-E-G (V)
(repeat)                         

D / A-C-F (ii)
C / B-D-G (I)
Bb / C-Eb-Ab (bVII)
Ab / D-F-Bb (bVI)
G / E-G-C (V)
(repeat)


IV-iii-ii-iii-IV-vi-ii-iii progression

F / E-A-C (IVM7)
E / D-G-B (iii7)
D / C-F-A (ii7)     
E / D-G-B (iii7)     
F / E-A-C (IVM7)     
A / D-G-B (?)  *this is an example of a layered chord, there is a G major chord in the RH w/an A in the LH     
D / C-F-A (ii7)     
E / D-G-B (iii7)     
(repeat)               

F / A-C-E (IVM7)
E / G-B-D (iii7)
D / F-A-C (ii7)
E / G-B-D (iii7)
F / F-A-C (IVM7)     
A / G-B-D (?)     
D / F-A-C (ii7)     
E / G-B-D (iii7)     
(repeat)               

F / C-E-A (IVM7)
E / B-D-G (iii7)
D / A-C-F (ii7)
E / B-D-G (iii7)
F / C-E-A (IVM7)
A / B-D-G (?)
D / A-C-F (ii7)
E / B-D-G (iii7)
(repeat)         

iii-IV-V-vi progression

E / Cadd9 (I6)     
F / Fadd9 (IV)     
G / Cadd9 (I 6/4)   
A / Fadd9 (IV6)     
(repeat)             

E / D-E-G-C (I6)
F / C-F-G-A (IV)
G / C-D-E-G (I 6/4)
A / G-A-C-F (IV6)
(repeat)


IV-IV-iii-vi-V progression

F / A-C-E (IVM7)
F / G-B-D (V4/2)
E / G-B-D (iii7)
A / G-B-D (?)
G / E-A-C# (VI4/2)
(repeat)


vi-iii-IV-V-#V progression

A / E-A-C (vi)
E / D-G-B (iii7)
F / E-A-C (IV7)
G / D-G-B  or  G / F-A-C (V)  *1st chord is a normal V, 2nd chord can either be an incomplete 11th or a layered chord
G# / D-F-G#-B (#V)
(repeat)


ii-V-I progression

D / B-E-G# or D-C / B-E-G# (?)  *another example of a layered chord, an E major chord in the RH w/a D in the LH
G / C-F-A (V)  *incomplete 11th or a layered chord
C / C-E-G (I)
(repeat)
Real musicians play in every key!!!
Music Theory, da numbers work!
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