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Author Topic: Explaining Progressions re-do  (Read 2802 times)

Offline T-Block

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Explaining Progressions re-do
« on: October 28, 2011, 11:46:18 AM »
Explaining Progressions

This is an excerpt from a theory book I used while taking music theory classes in college. It comes from observations of usage by classical composers in common practice. This isnít concrete, but it can be used as a guideline as to why certain chords are played in certain orders and stuff like that. The theory book uses Roman Numerals to represent numbers. Iíll post the Roman Numeral version and some number versions as well. Feel free to ask questions if something is unclear.


I is followed by IV or V, sometimes VI, less often II or III
II is followed by V, sometimes IV or VI, less often I or III
III is followed by VI, sometimes IV, less often I, II or V
IV is followed by V, sometimes I or II, less often III or VI
V is followed by I, sometimes IV or VI, less often II or III
VI is followed by II or V, sometimes III or IV, less often I
VII is followed by I or III, sometimes VI, less often II, IV or V


1 is followed by 4 or 5, sometimes 6, less often 2 or 3
2 is followed by 5, sometimes 4 or 6, less often 1 or 3
3 is followed by 6, sometimes 4, less often 1, 2 or 5
4 is followed by 5, sometimes 1 or 2, less often 3 or 6
5 is followed by 1, sometimes 4 or 6, less often 2 or 3
6 is followed by 2 or 5, sometimes 3 or 4, less often 1
7 is followed by 1 or 3, sometimes 6, less often 2, 4 or 5


Summary:

Usual: 1-4, 1-5, 2-5, 3-6, 4-5, 5-1, 6-2, 6-5, 7-1, 7-3

Sometimes: 1-6, 2-4, 2-6, 3-4, 4-1, 4-2, 5-4, 5-6, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6

Less often: 1-2, 1-3, 2-1, 2-3, 3-1, 3-2, 3-5, 4-3, 4-6, 5-2, 5-3, 6-1, 7-2, 7-4, 7-5
Real musicians play in every key!!!
Music Theory, da numbers work!

Offline musallio

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Re: Explaining Progressions re-do
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2011, 03:57:55 PM »
Interesting post.
As I was reading, i was thinking of all the nice progressions I tend to either hear or find myself playing, e.g a 2-3 or 3-4 etc.. I see/ use this alot in "contemporary music. i noticed that it sounds so good and fresh [if applied appropriately].
Question is: What makes these "not so common/ popular progressions" sound so good? Is it because they are not common or what? I know most of the time the 3 would be used as a passing chord to go to the four. I find that it sounds great in it's own way versus using a simple 1-4...
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Offline T-Block

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Re: Explaining Progressions re-do
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2011, 09:54:58 PM »
You gotta think about this in terms of where this whole music theory thing started (when they started writing it down in an organized fashion). It started with classical music, and most of the early composers used strict movements that the average joe would understand and accept. Much like how most pop/rock music use most of the same chord movements, how most of the early hymns used simple progressions, etc. People who were too much out the box weren't usually taken seriously until they were bout dead or after they were dead. Some of them made it, but the majority either vanished into obscurity or got with the program.

We are now in the day where those so-called not common progressions are normal. Now you gotta go way out the box is to get noticed. Everybody trying to outdo everybody else and the real musicianship is kinda getting lost.
Real musicians play in every key!!!
Music Theory, da numbers work!

Offline musallio

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Re: Explaining Progressions re-do
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2011, 04:52:16 AM »
People who were too much out the box weren't usually taken seriously until they were bout dead or after they were dead. Some of them made it, but the majority either vanished into obscurity or got with the program.


Not funny, but sounds funny- the image I get in my head :D ROFL...




We are now in the day where those so-called not common progressions are normal. Now you gotta go way out the box is to get noticed. Everybody trying to outdo everybody else and the real musicianship is kinda getting lost.

Yeah- preach it! That's why when I feel I'm getting too caught up in this cloud of "contemporary" music, i like to go back to basic old hymns and play them the good ol' way...

I like SoundofJoy's lil motto: I like music, all types [or something like that] :-\
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