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Author Topic: Using the Leslie switch  (Read 1361 times)

Offline kevnic

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Using the Leslie switch
« on: May 21, 2012, 11:38:19 AM »
What's up everyone!  I was wondering if anyone would care to
share their strategy on using the Leslie switch. 

I try to use it when I am on a certain chord for a short while, or
in the middle of a run I'll turn it on.

What are some of your strategies?

Offline Mysteryman

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2012, 10:19:08 AM »
It depends on the sound of the organ. If it has a rich, warm sound, I tend to have it off then turn it on when I want to build up tension. I do have to catch myself sometimes for over use. If you practice keeping it on slow or off your brain will tell you when to turn it on.
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Offline sonicfoxbody

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2012, 11:42:02 AM »
There's not really much of a strategy, it depends on the user. I couldn't tell you how I'd use my C/T switch as it greatly depends on what I'm playing. I have heard lots of foolishness on how you are "supposed" to use a C/T switch and when to switch. Individuals have told me silliness like "Chorale when on a verse, tremolo during a chorus" really? There's no manual on the usage. One thing that I absolutely think is ridiculous are the musicians who go from one speed to the other and switch it back before it even makes its full transition. I've watched musicians that do that repeatedly.
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Offline under13

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2012, 01:16:30 PM »
In many situations, when I think about Tremolo, I think intensity. So in the places where you want to be intense, you can switch it to fast after being on slow for a while and it will create a dramatic change. The Chorus and Drawbars play a part in this as well.

So say the Pastor is just talking in a mild tone of voice that may be leading to a praise, you may want to keep it on chorale with the chorus off, and the drawbars on a  mellow setting while the second set of drawbars is on full setting.

Now when he decides to go into a praise, you quickly flip the chorus on, change  the preset key to the more full drawbar setting and hit the leslie switch, and that will make it so much more dramatic and exciting. You can even switch to a higher key while doing all that and it will make it even more dramatic.

So it's not just the leslie switch, it's how you use all of the other features of the organ together. There are times when you may not even touch the leslie switch for a whole song. See the below clip with Twinkie Clark. She doesn't touch the leslie at all, but instead uses the chorus and the drawbars to add dynamics. Also check out the other clip with PJ Morgan and he talks a little about that.

As for using slow during the verses and fast during the chorus, I see nothing wrong with that. It doesnt work for every song, but for me it goes back to the intensity thing. Sometimes the chorus gets more intense, so I may use it in that way.


Twinkie's Organ Prelude (High Place)


B3 Drawbars in Solo Situations

Offline PianoClubhouse

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2012, 04:03:04 PM »
Here is another that may help.
♫ THE LESLIE SWITCH: When to flip it off/on - gospel organ tutorial ♫

Offline docjohn

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2012, 08:07:36 AM »
nice stuff guys!

I use the fast just to punch it UP a bit,@ the end of a chorus etc..I like the spin/up ,spin down more than just fast.Too many cats overuse the switch-can't play 2 measures w/o flipping it.

A tech I knew had a PR 40 + 122 hooked up to his rig with the correct relays in it.With the cabinets on opposite sides,the whole switching deal was more pronounced.I think some speakers cut in/out depending on the C/T settings.Nice sound-too bad AIDs got him early.

Offline knox06

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2012, 08:52:01 AM »
Thanks for the information. I have a C3 Hammond with a  PR 40 and 22H Leslie at my church. We only have the Leslie hooked up now. But our Leslie switch is only off and fast. The other week a guy came to our church and was playing the organ and he kept switching it off and on. I mean he didn't even let the horns spin all the way before he turned it off. I am watchful when others come in and play our organ (because I have had so much work done to it).

Offline under13

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2012, 05:35:26 PM »
Yeah, that sound in between fast and slow and vice versa is awesome, and that could be one of the reasons why some people flip it so often.

Offline RoyalJimP

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2012, 09:49:50 PM »
Yea the 22H only has off and fast. Had one several years before I found a great deal on a 122, (2 speed motors). There was a song we played quite often back then that my head would hear "man chorale would sound good there so I would switch to fast and before it could ramp up all the way would kick it back to off, kinda emulating slow. It worked for me and didn't seem to hurt nothin.  ::)

Offline knox06

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2012, 11:30:54 AM »
Yea the 22H only has off and fast. Had one several years before I found a great deal on a 122, (2 speed motors). There was a song we played quite often back then that my head would hear "man chorale would sound good there so I would switch to fast and before it could ramp up all the way would kick it back to off, kinda emulating slow. It worked for me and didn't seem to hurt nothin.  ::)

Cool. Thanks. Yeah, he used to come and play after we got the organ and it seems like after he would play it a couple of time, the fuse would always blow in the Leslie. I wasn't sure if it was because of that reason. But, he stopped coming as often and now I'm the only one who plays for the most part and I haven't had trouble out of the Leslie with the fuse. I called my tech and he told me I should turn the organ off when I'm not playing it. And he said, nothing seemed to be wrong with it when he came out. So, I wasn't sure if it was because he kept turning the switch on and off so much. But, it all good.

Offline docjohn

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2012, 09:30:17 AM »
You know-that 22 H can be upgrade to a "122" several ways;change the motor out completely.I'd just do the upper if you can get away with it.You may have to swap speed switches;you would have fast/slow on the upper and off/fast on the lower.

I've actually unplugged the lower fast on one of my 122's.

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Offline unauthpoet21

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Re: Using the Leslie switch
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2012, 12:44:44 PM »
I have a kit that can be installed on any single speed leslie that controls the motor voltage and makes any single speed leslie 2 speeds. Alex McCowan @ www.hammondorganforyou.com 919.889.0121
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