LearnGospelMusic.com Community

Please login or register.
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6]   Go Down

Author Topic: Music Theory Never Stop Learning  (Read 16724 times)

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #100 on: August 29, 2006, 05:18:55 PM »
COOL COOL COOL  ;D :D ;D :D
AT LEAST SOMEONE IS DOING SOMETHING BESIDES POSTING CRAZY TOPICS

Offline Andrzej

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 367
  • Gender: Male
  • I've got 5 on it!
    • Kings Church

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #101 on: August 29, 2006, 11:15:45 PM »
COOL COOL COOL  ;D :D ;D :D
AT LEAST SOMEONE IS DOING SOMETHING BESIDES POSTING CRAZY TOPICS

LOL!!!  I hear ya!

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #102 on: August 30, 2006, 11:07:58 AM »
GREAT JOB  J ;D :D ;D :D ;D :D ;D :D ;D

THIS IS WHAT I AM TAKING ABOUT  ::)

NOW IN 1 YEAR 2 YEARS WHATEVER WHEN MY MAN Jeremyr IS ON THAT NEXT LEVEL OF PLAYING.

HOW MANY OF YOU WILL STILL BE ASKING

MMMMMMMMM how did you get there?

AAAAAAAAAAA  I need help ?

OOOOOOOOOo I dont understand?

AND I AM NOT TRYING TO BE FUNNY.

THIS MAY GIVE YOU A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF MY THOUGHT PROCESS.

I HAVE SMALL CHILDREN THAT I MAKE PRACTICE. THEY CRY TO MY WIFE , TO ME, HATE ME  :-\ "DADDYS SO MEAN"  >:(THATS RIGHT  :D ;D :D ;D

SO YOU UNDERSTAND LET ME TELL A SHORT STORY and if you know me you are saying" when dont you thomas" ;D

I AM A BASS PLAYER ( LOVE MY BASS) IN MUSIC SCHOOL I COULD NOT READ MUSIC SO IN JAZZ BAND I COULD NOT PLAY BASS. (HAD TO BE ABLE TO READ)

MY PROFESSOR HAD TO HAVE ME IN CLASS SO......... HE PUT ME ON DRUMS,IT TOOK 3 YEARS UNTIL I COULD READ A CHART IN REAL TIME
NOW AT BERKLEE SO MANY BAD PLAYERS I NEVER DID MAKE FIRST CHAIR IN JAZZ, IN MY FUNK/R&B OH YES, BUT JAZZ NO .

BUT NOT ONLY DID I LEARN TO READ. I  CAN PLAY DRUMS  ?/?AT THE TIME, I WOULD THINK, GREAT. BIG DEAL :-\ :-\
WHILE THE PROFESSOR IS STANDING BEHIND ME WITH A CONDUCTORS STICK

1+E A 2+E A 3+E A 4+E A come on thomas timing, timing, "WHACK" hey OHHHHHHHHHH

I STILL PLAY SOMETIMES, BUT SO IT IS NOT A TOTAL WASTE "I DO NOT WANT TO PLAY DRUMS" SO MY 6 YEAR OLD PLAYS DRUMS, 5 YEAR OLD BASS
 AND MY 11 KEYS (maybe I should start a band)

SORRY BACK TO THE KIDS THEIR MEAN DAD >:(
WELL A MONTH AGO AT MY 6YRS OLD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL THEY HAD A TALENT SHOW ?/? 1 GRADE TO 5 GRADE KIDS PLAYING ALL KINDS OF STUFF
WELL TO THE POINT>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

MY SON WAS PLAYING LIKE THE KIDS IN 5TH HE IS IN 2ND. WHY BECAUSE INSTEAD OF WASTING TIME HE IS PRACTICING FOR AT LEAST 1 1/2 A DAY
HE DOES NOT LIKE ME NOW BUT HIS LITTLE ATTITUDE CHANGED AFTER THAT SHOW WHEN EVERYBODY WAS SAYING:
 ;D :D ;)WOW YOU ARE REALLY GOOD HOW OLD ARE YOU" WOW

NOW DOES HE LOOK AT PRACTICE DIFFERENT YES. NOW ?/? IM ALREADY GOOD DAD I DONT HAVE TO PRACTICE ANY MORE" REEEEEEEEEEEALY
BOY YOU BETTER GET BACK ON THAT SET  :(

THIS HAS MANY MESSAGES IN THE STORY I USE IT FOR MY SELF JUST WANTED TO SHARE

? ARE YOU PLAYING FOR THE ATTENTION? because once you get to a certain level you will get it! 
I did for a long time and do you know what it did for my playing NOTHING!!!! MADE ME WORSE DO I LOVE TO PLAY NOT PERFORM

? DO YOU FIGHT WITH YOURSELF TO PRACTICE!! I had to dicipline myself and still do I did not have what my son has.

? DO YOU MAKE EXCUSES FOR YOUR LEVEL OF PLAYING. still do to this day but am I stopping yes I am, should I be getting lessons from Victor Wooten or Playing at a show with him??????????

THINK ABOUT WHERE YOU NEED TO GO, ALOT OF THIS IS A MENTAL THING IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH YOUR BASS AT ALL.

GOD BLESS.




 

Offline jeremyr

  • LGM Royalty
  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2215
  • Gender: Male
  • Callowhill fanatic
    • My Youtube Chanel

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #103 on: August 30, 2006, 11:37:47 AM »
Man I know how your son feels.  I use to be the same way about piano practice.  I didn't really appreciate what my mom made me do until a couple of years ago.

I'm moving onto harmonic minor modes next.  I'm still having a tough time remember all the names for them, but it'll come with time and patience.

Somebody put me in the key of E#

Offline BassAddict

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 300
  • Gender: Male
    • Myspace

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #104 on: August 30, 2006, 04:01:28 PM »
Let me know who is on the GAME AND WHO IS JUST WASTING TIME
AND I DO ALREDY KNOW WHOM IS JOKERS.

LEAVE A REPLY IF YOU LEARNED YOUR MODES IN AT LEAST 1 KEY AND IF YOU HEARD ANYTHING THAT YOU HAVE NOT BEFORE WITH THE CHORDS THAT I GAVE YOU.

HOW MANY GOT THE LOUIS JOHNSON BASS LINE DOWN , CLEAN ON TIME ECT

LET ME KNOW...


I know all of my modes in all keys as well as melodic minor, harmonic minor, major and minor penatonic, etc. But the main problem that I am having is where and how do I apply it in a song. I have developed an ear to find the key a song is played in, and when I find it I can tell if it is using a major or minor by the 3rd and the 6th, but I still don't understand where Dorian or Aeolian would come to play in that other than what I would be playing anyway...how do we construct runs around the modes into the song? That is what I don't understand bc I could practice my modes all day long and all it sounds like to me are scales (which they are) but it all means nothing if I cant use it in my playing.
Acts 4:12

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #105 on: August 30, 2006, 05:03:22 PM »
TAKE A SONG FIGURE OUT WHAT KEY/MODE IT IS IN AND PLAY AROUND THE CHORDS

TRY THAT FIRST I WILL POST A EXAMPLE

Offline cardfandan

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 48
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #106 on: August 31, 2006, 01:58:49 PM »
Modal theory is all about improv. For instance, the Dorian mode (AKA: 2nd mode) is sometimes called the "Dorian minor." Why? Because in jazz, the ii (minor second) chord is extremely common and most soloists (especially on the upright) will solo in the dorian mode above the minor chord. Also, the entire mode is only different from the natural minor scale by one note.

Knowing modal theory is not a way to avoid more classic theory, instead it is a useful tangent from classic theory. The more theory that you learn the more you will see how the modes tie together.

I put together a thread about basic modes. You dudes who practice modes all the time should give it a quick look and see if you think that it is simple enough for a beginner to study (and make sure that I didn't screw something up -I already caught one mistake on my own!).

http://www.learngospelmusic.com/forums/index.php/topic,32656.0.html
Exodus 34:14

Offline Torch7

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2077
  • Gender: Male
    • Gospel Bass Guitar Lessons Site

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #107 on: August 31, 2006, 02:07:18 PM »
Good looking out CardFanDan...

I gonna take a look at that thread...  My co-worker just gave me "Gig Bag Book of Bass Scales" too, so I will take a look at it when I get home as well.

Thanks again.

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #108 on: August 31, 2006, 02:43:48 PM »
THANKS FRET THERE ARE 12 MORE TO POST I WILL SEND THEM TO YOU THANKS AGAIN


Ok, I know some of you have been waiting for this one so here it is. On this page THE POST ABOVE BY FRET , you'll see all of the modes as you would play them on your guitar to make up a certain key.

I am going to show all of the modes in the key of E Aeolian first since it is a popular scale for blues, rock, and many other styles of music. I am not going to explain how the diagrams work here as you should understand them by the time you get to this lesson. If you do not understand the diagrams, there is a lesson on them in the first section.

So without further delay, here is the complete key of E Aeolian :

note : this is very important and must be learned

If you start on ANY note and move forward following this pattern of intervals, you will find the "ionian mode" (or the major scale) in your chosen key (the note you started on).
 all of these notes are played using the E as your root note, then you will be playing E Aeolian.

As we talked about in the previous lesson, every modal scale you play actually contains seven different scales in seven different keys. Notice how the first note of Ionian falls on the G note. That would make that position G Ionian, and if you played all of the same notes for E Aeolian but used the G note as the root, the whole entire thing would become G Ionian. So what we have here is E Aeolian and six other modes that fall into different keys.

So E Aeolian actually includes these seven scales in thier respective keys :

1. E Aeolian
2. F# Locrian
3. G Ionian
4. A Dorian
5. B Phrygian
6. C Lydian
7. D MixolydiaN

THE LETTER REPRSENT THE MODE IN THE KEY OF E

A=AEOLIAN
I = IONIAN   ECT.

AS IN MODE 1 EXAMP Notice the optional notes, you must choose one or the other. The notes with the dots in them are NOT the root notes, but rather "optional" notes. There are two in each position and they are the exact same note, so you must choose the one that is more comfortable for you and not

The 7 modal formulas will show us how the other scales relate to ionian. We will start off by assuming that ionian is :

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

One letter for each of the seven notes. By assuming this information, we can now label the other scales and have something to relate it to. I will explain further below.

The 7 modal formulas are :

IONIAN - 0 sharps, 0 flats   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   1
DORIAN - 2 flats   1   2   b3   4   5   6   b7   1
PHRYGIAN - 4 flats   1   b2   b3   4   5   b6   b7   1
LYDIAN - 1 sharp   1   2   3   #4   5   6   7   1
MIXOLYDIAN - 1 flat   1   2   3   4   5   6   b7   1
AEOLIAN - 3 flats   1   2   b3   4   5   b6   b7   1
LOCRIAN - 5 flats   1   b2   b3   4   b5   b6   b7   1

What this means is that to get dorian (which has two flats) you would take ionian and just flat the 3rd and 7th notes. This is because it will be all of the exact same notes as ionian EXCEPT for the 3rd and the 7th, as the chart above shows.

Its a good idea to have these formulas memorized, but I found them difficult to memorize this way. We will go on to "the order of flats" as covering that now seems to make this easier to remember.


he order of flats is something we learn just to get an idea of how each scale is different from the others. It gives us a kind of spectrum of how each sounds, as well how each mode relates to each other. This is just a way of looking at them in a different sense and in no way changes the order of the modes the way you have already memorized them. The modes are always in the order that you learned them in previous lessons, but since this is the internet and things need to be a clear as possible I figured I try to make it clearer.

What we are going to do is jumble the modes up into the order that they would be in according to the way they sound. This will help us see more clearly the difference between modes and the way they sound, and also helps to make the modal formulas easier to remember.

The Order Of Flats

LYDIAN   IONIAN   MIXOLYDIAN   DORIAN   AEOLIAN   PHRYGIAN   LOCRIAN
1 sharp   --   1 flat   2 flats   3 flats   4 flats   5 flats
#   --   b   bb   bbb   bbbb   bbbbb

You can now see that each of the 7 modes are one neat step away from the next. Its starting to look like these scales aren't a bunch of meaningless theory, but that they actually fit together nice and neatly, each one serving a purpose that the others can't.

We can also now see a spectrum of sounds here, ranging from bright and happy to dark and dissident. Generally, the scales that use major notes with no flats are very happy and bright sounding. The scales that use a lot of flats have a darker mood.

I will give a general and vague sense of what each scale sounds like and what it might be used for. However, my opinions on these will be very general and not something to be taken very seriously, its just a guide to help you get started. Many good musicians can alter the feeling of any scale with playing techniques and such, so just get a basic idea here and then see what you can do with it.

Spectrum of modes based on how they sound

LYDIAN   IONIAN   MIXOLYDIAN   DORIAN   AEOLIAN   PHRYGIAN   LOCRIAN
brightest   ----   ----   ----   ----   ----   darkest


LYDIAN - very bright, upbeat. Good for anything very bright and upbeat such as pop, kids music, etc

IONIAN - very sweet, happy, bright. Perfect for happy songs, love songs, etc. Used for almost all childrens music

MIXOLYDIAN - middle of the road bright scale. Good for light rock, pop, country, etc

DORIAN - perfect middle ground. Not too bright, not to dark. Good for country, rock, blues.

AEOLIAN - gritty, bluesy, warm sounding rock scale. This is the standard rock and blues scale.

PHRYGIAN - dark, classical metal sound. A Randy Rhoads favorite.

LOCRIAN - very dark, dissident, brooding. Good for heavy metal, dark classical, etc


Now that we have looked at what this all means to the 'lehman', we can go on and learn a little more about the details of how this works.

Remember when I said that understanding the order of flats would make memorizing the modal formulas easier ? Now we get to find out why this is. Each of the scales that include flats, which would be 5 of them (most), are really the same as the one before with the addition of one new flat.

LYDIAN   #4   --   --   --   --   --   --
IONIAN   --   0/0   --   --   --   --   --
MIXOLYDIAN   --   --   b7   --   --   --   --
DORIAN   --   --   b7   b3   --   --   --
AEOLIAN   --   --   b7   b3   b6   --   --
PHRYGIAN   --   --   b7   b3   b6   b2   --
LOCRIAN   --   --   b7   b3   b6   b2   b5

So if you can remember the order that the flats come in, memorizing the modal formulas becomes much easier. Once you learn the order of flats, you should have a much better understanding of what makes each scale different, and why each one sounds the way it does.


he order of flats is something we learn just to get an idea of how each scale is different from the others. It gives us a kind of spectrum of how each sounds, as well how each mode relates to each other. This is just a way of looking at them in a different sense and in no way changes the order of the modes the way you have already memorized them. The modes are always in the order that you learned them in previous lessons, but since this is the internet and things need to be a clear as possible I figured I try to make it clearer.

What we are going to do is jumble the modes up into the order that they would be in according to the way they sound. This will help us see more clearly the difference between modes and the way they sound, and also helps to make the modal formulas easier to remember.

The Order Of Flats

LYDIAN   IONIAN   MIXOLYDIAN   DORIAN   AEOLIAN   PHRYGIAN   LOCRIAN
1 sharp   --   1 flat   2 flats   3 flats   4 flats   5 flats
#   --   b   bb   bbb   bbbb   bbbbb

You can now see that each of the 7 modes are one neat step away from the next. Its starting to look like these scales aren't a bunch of meaningless theory, but that they actually fit together nice and neatly, each one serving a purpose that the others can't.

We can also now see a spectrum of sounds here, ranging from bright and happy to dark and dissident. Generally, the scales that use major notes with no flats are very happy and bright sounding. The scales that use a lot of flats have a darker mood.

I will give a general and vague sense of what each scale sounds like and what it might be used for. However, my opinions on these will be very general and not something to be taken very seriously, its just a guide to help you get started. Many good musicians can alter the feeling of any scale with playing techniques and such, so just get a basic idea here and then see what you can do with it.

Spectrum of modes based on how they sound

LYDIAN   IONIAN   MIXOLYDIAN   DORIAN   AEOLIAN   PHRYGIAN   LOCRIAN
brightest   ----   ----   ----   ----   ----   darkest


LYDIAN - very bright, upbeat. Good for anything very bright and upbeat such as pop, kids music, etc

IONIAN - very sweet, happy, bright. Perfect for happy songs, love songs, etc. Used for almost all childrens music

MIXOLYDIAN - middle of the road bright scale. Good for light rock, pop, country, GOSPEL

DORIAN - perfect middle ground. Not too bright, not to dark. Good for country, rock, blues.

AEOLIAN - gritty, bluesy, warm sounding rock scale. This is the standard rock and blues scale.

PHRYGIAN - dark, classical metal sound. A Randy Rhoads favorite.

LOCRIAN - very dark, dissident, brooding. Good for heavy metal, dark classical, etc



Remember when I said that understanding the order of flats would make memorizing the modal formulas easier ? Now we get to find out why this is. Each of the scales that include flats, which would be 5 of them (most), are really the same as the one before with the addition of one new flat.

LYDIAN   #4   --   --   --   --   --   --
IONIAN   --   0/0   --   --   --   --   --
MIXOLYDIAN   --   --   b7   --   --   --   --
DORIAN   --   --   b7   b3   --   --   --
AEOLIAN   --   --   b7   b3   b6   --   --
PHRYGIAN   --   --   b7   b3   b6   b2   --
LOCRIAN   --   --   b7   b3   b6   b2   b5



PLEASE AND I AM ASKING NICELY PLEASE DO NOT HI JACK SOMEONES THREAD THAT IS WHAT CREATE TOPIC MEANS
I WOULD LOVE THE HELP BUT MODES WERE ON THE 1 PAGE OF THIS I AM MOVING FROM MELODIC MINOR TO HARMONIC

LAST POST WAS MELODIC MINOR

Offline Brother Pope

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #109 on: September 01, 2006, 09:37:44 AM »
Hello Thomas1168 I been trying to play the 4-string bass for over 2-years now I've taken one one lessons and I play in my church I also purchase a few books on how to play the bass guitar. I go on the net all the time looking for ways to learn more. I really feel that I'm missing something because I don't understand what tells me which notes to play,  Example: If a song is in the key of C, based on the C-scale how do I know which notes to play in that scale?? I'm clueless. I always said that if I could learn how to figure out what to play then I wouldn't have to ask the key board player for notes. Can some body please help the brother out.

God bless

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #110 on: September 01, 2006, 10:04:44 AM »
WELCOME TO LGM

WHAT I AM POSTING HERE IS MORE ADVANCED, GO THE THE MUSIC THOERY POSTS ON THIS WEB SITE AND LOOK FOR POSTS BY T-BLOCK AWSOME POSTS ON BASIC MUSIC THEORY. THERE ARE FORMULAS TO BUILDING ALL OF YOUR SCALES NOT MATTER WHAT KEY YOU ARE IN.

LOOK AT T-BLOCKS POST THEY ARE GREAT

GOD BLESS

Offline Mysteryman

  • Moderator
  • LGM Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 7804
  • Gender: Male
  • The Jamaican breakfast patty created by me. :)
    • http://www.geocities.com/mysterymman1

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #111 on: September 08, 2006, 01:12:11 AM »
I dont like alot of stickys but I will make this post one for a little while for the new people. Alot of information here.
Vision without action is just day dreaming. I miss practicing.

Offline Willie L. Terry Jr

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 323
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #112 on: September 11, 2006, 11:27:06 PM »
Man this thread is still going...gotta be some kind of record. 

Thomas....

Just wanted you to know I ain't gone know where.  If you look at my myspace calendar you'll see why.

I have to focus on upcoming events between know and December.  September - P&W conference, October Franklin Grahm (Billy's son) rally, Noveber - Franklin Grahm - actuall event with One Accord.  Not to mention every Sunday at church and Fridays with my own band.  I'm gonna focus on playing with my friends for the rest of the year because I'm moving to Vegas in December and a lot of these cats I won't get to see again. 

I have from January to March to polish up on technique, theory, reading etc because I have audition in January at UNLV.  March I'll be at Gerald Veasley's Bass BootCamp.  Gouche and Fitzgerald or one of the two should be there.  Gerald just asked Maurice to come so that should be interesting.  After March I plan on having a coming out party (not official) but I plan on seriously looking to get out there.  I will travel to the bay area hopefully to get with Mr. Forrest (Gerald) from gospel chops.  Gouche does some open sheds and I plan on hooking up with a few Bass BootCamp Alums to cutt and get cutt.  After a full year I think I'll be ready to work with some artist.

So I have a plan, it's just moving from another country has it's own challenges, physically, mentally and spiritually.

Yall keep us lifted up in prayer!

T.J.
Psalms 144:1  Blessed be the Lord my rock who teaches my hands to war and my FINGAZ to fight!

Offline jeremyr

  • LGM Royalty
  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2215
  • Gender: Male
  • Callowhill fanatic
    • My Youtube Chanel

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #113 on: September 11, 2006, 11:58:29 PM »
March I'll be at Gerald Veasley's Bass BootCamp.  Gouche and Fitzgerald or one of the two should be there.  Gerald just asked Maurice to come so that should be interesting.

T.J.

I plan on going myself.
Somebody put me in the key of E#

Offline Willie L. Terry Jr

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 323
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #114 on: September 12, 2006, 06:39:49 PM »
Cool you'll have lots of fun.  It's the most intense three days of bass'n I've ever expierenced.  Hopefully a few more LGMers will represent.  I've been hastling Gerald to get a gospel bassist to come.  On the short list is:

Thaddeus Tribbett
Andrew Gouche
Maurice Fitzgerald

I'll keep you all posted on who's coming.  I know that Adam Nitti, Bakithi Kamulu (spelled wrong), Gary Willis, Doug Wimbish, Jeff Schmidtz, Micheal Manring and few other bassist will be there.  Besides, you'll learn enough from other campers.  Last year Scott Ambush came through and Irvin Fryer formerly of the Philadelphia Eagles came through to minister to us...and he did minister.  The bassist for his church in Jersey comes to camp every year too.  Two years ago Victor Wooten came through and shocked everyone.  I wasn't there for that one but I heard it was crazy.  Because I give Gerald such a hard time he may get some current Eagles to come through just to spite me so we'll see.  It's well worth the money!

T.J.
Psalms 144:1  Blessed be the Lord my rock who teaches my hands to war and my FINGAZ to fight!

Offline ladybass

  • LGM Royalty
  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1270
  • Gender: Female
    • My Bass Grooves

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #115 on: September 15, 2006, 08:15:21 AM »
Cool you'll have lots of fun.  It's the most intense three days of bass'n I've ever expierenced.  Hopefully a few more LGMers will represent.  I've been hastling Gerald to get a gospel bassist to come.  On the short list is:

Thaddeus Tribbett
Andrew Gouche
Maurice Fitzgerald

I'll keep you all posted on who's coming.  I know that Adam Nitti, Bakithi Kamulu (spelled wrong), Gary Willis, Doug Wimbish, Jeff Schmidtz, Micheal Manring and few other bassist will be there.  Besides, you'll learn enough from other campers.  Last year Scott Ambush came through and Irvin Fryer formerly of the Philadelphia Eagles came through to minister to us...and he did minister.  The bassist for his church in Jersey comes to camp every year too.  Two years ago Victor Wooten came through and shocked everyone.  I wasn't there for that one but I heard it was crazy.  Because I give Gerald such a hard time he may get some current Eagles to come through just to spite me so we'll see.  It's well worth the money!

T.J.

Definitely keep us posted on this ... I wanted to go last year, but it didn't work out.  I can start saving now.    ;D

Offline ladybass

  • LGM Royalty
  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1270
  • Gender: Female
    • My Bass Grooves

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #116 on: September 15, 2006, 08:18:30 AM »


Spectrum of modes based on how they sound

LYDIAN   IONIAN   MIXOLYDIAN   DORIAN   AEOLIAN   PHRYGIAN   LOCRIAN
brightest   ----   ----   ----   ----   ----   darkest


LYDIAN - very bright, upbeat. Good for anything very bright and upbeat such as pop, kids music, etc

IONIAN - very sweet, happy, bright. Perfect for happy songs, love songs, etc. Used for almost all childrens music

MIXOLYDIAN - middle of the road bright scale. Good for light rock, pop, country, etc

DORIAN - perfect middle ground. Not too bright, not to dark. Good for country, rock, blues.

AEOLIAN - gritty, bluesy, warm sounding rock scale. This is the standard rock and blues scale.

PHRYGIAN - dark, classical metal sound. A Randy Rhoads favorite.

LOCRIAN - very dark, dissident, brooding. Good for heavy metal, dark classical, etc


WoW ... this is good to know.  I never thought of modes in this way.  I was working on modes lastnight while watchin Norm Stockton's DVD.  Thanks Thomas!!!

Offline phbrown

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12070
  • Google Fiber

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #117 on: September 27, 2011, 08:42:40 PM »
Thank you Thomas!... I see you are a true musician and a teacher. Keep bringing I am listening and learning...

all right just finished lesson one, I already knew it but it was presented in a different way and I learned a few more things :)
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6]   Go Up