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Author Topic: Music Theory Never Stop Learning  (Read 16721 times)

Offline Dwalk

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2006, 01:52:40 PM »
I haven't posted in a while because I haven't seen alot of new and useful stuff.
Dude! you are the man!

God bless you and your ministry.

Offline Mysteryman

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2006, 05:43:20 PM »
Wow. Thats alot of info to process thanks for the post thomas.  :D
Vision without action is just day dreaming. I miss practicing.

Offline praiseHisname

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2006, 01:25:33 AM »
Thomas

For the first example, lets assume that you have determined the song is in the key of E, and also uses the F, G, A, B and C notes. 
bass guitar piano any and every part played in the song
.

This one is almost analyzed for us already and I'll bet you can see what it looks like. The first and easiest way to analyze this is to simply look at the pattern. You may see what modal position it looks like.

Is there any way the scale for a song using these notes could be E Ionian ? It should be clear why this could not be E Ionian but I will explain. If you already know the intervals for each scale (and you should), you would know that E Ionian would start with the E note, and then be followed by F# and G#. So it could not be the E major scale as our scale uses F and G. Simply imagine playing the Ionian position starting on the E and you'll see that it would not work.


WE ARE TAKING ABOUT THE EXAMPLE  EFGABC
So what else can we determine here using the same method ? We can see that this scale starts off with the root, minor 2nd, and the minor 3rd. If you know your modes and their intervals, you will see that there are only two modes that this example could be. The minor 2nd here is the key to this, as this note is only present in two of our modes. These modes would be Phrygian and Locrian. Every other mode that you have learned used the major 2nd, except for Phrygian and Locrian.

So which of these two is it ? The Locrian position would be root (E), minor 2 (F), minor 3 (G), perf 4 (A), dim 5 (A#), minor 6 (C). That clearly couldn't be it, because this scale does not use the A# note, it uses the B. Phrygian would use all of the same notes as locrian except for that A# where phrygian would use the B.

So there you have it, this would be E Phrygian based on the notes we see being used. Since we have a lot of the notes being used, you may have recognized the phrygian position here already. In the next one, we will work with fewer notes to make it a little less recognizable. If you still don't understand how this is done, don't worry JUST EMAIL ME YOU WILL GET IT.


Thomas,

A big thank you for taking the time to share your knowledge with me/us. Just wow! I'm sitting here in awe because I can't tell you how many books, videos, and CDs  I've gone through trying to get an understanding on the modes and how to use them, not to metion my time spent searching the Internet, and none of that stuff brought it home like you just did. It's no doubt that this will help alot of us aspiring bassis. I can really feel your passion in what you’re doing to help others along. May the Lord bless thee and keep thee... Thanks again and I'm looking forward to your next lessons!
To YOU God be the glory!

Offline DRaymond

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #23 on: August 05, 2006, 08:39:37 PM »
Thanks man, good stuff. some of us will pick up on it faster than others, so please keep posting and going deeper. this is exactly what i was looking for.
If you only knew what I was gonna be after the storm, you wouldn't have bothered me!

Offline Andrzej

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #24 on: August 05, 2006, 09:55:10 PM »
I am going to recomend to my students to join LGM because if posts like this!  I only teach 3 kids on a one-to-one bassis and I teach practically as my teaching notes are not best explained, not as good as all of this!  Stuff like this would really benefit them for sure.

Thomas...you the man!  Great learning materials...thanks for sharing.



I REALLY DONT HAVE THE TIME TO TEACH
NOW IN SOME CASES THAT COULD BE TRUE BUT 9 OUT OF 10 TIMES THAT PERSON IS SELFISH OR INSECURE WITH THEM SELF REGARDLESS OF THEIR PLAYING ABITITY
IT WOULD TAKE ME 15 MINUTES TO TEACH ANYONE ABOUT SCALES AND MODES AND TAKE YOU 5-6 MONTHS TO REALLY GET IT DOWN MABYE WITH ACOUPLE QUESTIONS HERE AND THERE
SO 45 MIN OUT OF SOMEONES TIME IN 6 MONTHS WELL  YOU UNDERSTAND


Oh, I love this one!  Guys, please hear me when I say this...if someone comes to for advice or encouragement and you have the knowledge or experience to help them out please be humble and gracious to do so.  It doesn't matter if you only know a couple of scales or if you are a seasoned pro, if you are able to give good advice and improve someones musicianship so that they can be fruitful.  I know giving the time can be a royal pain and it is not always possible to do so, but remember how you got to where you have got to in your skills and knowledge...other people helping you when you searched for it.  I am personally very shy and I talk with a speach impediment, but God still uses me even though I sometimes think I am not a great teacher because what I think of my short comings.  God will honour your whatever time you can give and will bless you and whomever may come to you for help.  We're all family under God and we need to support each other as good famillies do.

Offline thomas1168

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #25 on: August 06, 2006, 10:48:40 PM »
Hello Everyone,

Thank you for all of your awsome responses. I am only doing what everyone should be being a good shepard (trying).
I just got back from NY studio sessions nightmare
BUT IT GAVE ME A AWSOME IDEA FOR MY NEXT LESSON PLAYING BASS KEYBOARDS AND LAYERING LIVE BASS TO ACCENT
BUT IT WAS A LONG HARD TRIP AND THE PRODUCERS WAS NOT SAVED AND SEEMED TO ALMOST ACT LIKE A DEVIL EVERYTIME I MENTIONED GOD

GIVE ME A COUPLE DAYS TO RECOUP BEFORE THE NEXT LESSON

Offline thomas1168

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #26 on: August 11, 2006, 01:41:22 PM »
NOW WE WILL START TO LOOK AT THE MOST COMMON CHORDS THAT WE WILL PLAY OUR MODES AROUND

Offline Bullitt

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #27 on: August 14, 2006, 11:20:51 AM »
EXCELLENT POST.  Keep the info coming ladies and gents!


God Bless,
-J

Offline thomas1168

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #28 on: August 14, 2006, 01:06:23 PM »
Lesson 3 - Chords and Bass Lines

   In Lesson 1, we talked about using the root note of a chord to define the
chord, and in Lesson 2 we talked about using leading tones to move from
one chord root to the next. In this lesson, we'll talk about playing notes
from the chords other than the root notes, and about using them to construct
bass figures that you can play over several different chords.

   To repeat the definition from Lesson 1, a chord is any group of three or
more notes being played simultaneously. The simplest ones are groups of
exactly three notes: more complex ones are built by adding extra notes to one
of the basic ones. There are four three-note chords, but only two of them are
used in most forms of music, major chords and minor chords. (The other two,
augmented and diminshed chords, are used mostly in jazz and classical music. I
won't mention them again in this lesson, although they'll reappear in a later
lesson.)

   A major chord consists of three notes; the root note, a note which is two
whole steps above the root (called the third), and another note which is one
and one-half steps above the third (called the fifth). It may seem odd to call
the notes third and fifth instead of second and third; but there's a reason
for it, which I'll explain in the next lesson. To give an example, the three
note C, E, and G make up a C major chord. E, the third, is two whole steps
above the root note, C: and G, the fifth, is 1.5 steps above the E. If you
wanted to play these notes on your bass, you might finger them like this:

G------------
D------2--5--
A---3--------
E------------

and you'd get a C major chord. In fact, the pattern:

-----(N-1)--(N+2)--
--N----------------

  2   1      4

on any two consecutive strings will produce a major chord, and this is a
fingering that you can use over and over again in your bass lines. (The
numbers below the staff indicate fingerings: use your middle finger to play
the root, your index finger for the third, and your pinkie for the fifth. Then
you can reach all three notes without moving your left hand.)

   A minor chord is similar to a major chord, but the intervals are reversed:
that is, the third is 1.5 steps above the root, and the fifth is two steps
above the third. Thus, the notes C-Eb-G make up a C minor chord. Note that the
root and the fifth are the same: only the third differs, and that's what makes
the two chords sound different when played on a guitar. You can play a C minor
chord like this:

G------------
D---------5--
A---3--6-----
E------------

and in general the pattern:

------------(N+2)--
--N--(N+3)-----------

  1   4      3

produces the notes of a minor chord, and you can play all three without moving
your left hand.

In the past lessons we've used the root note of a chord to define it, but now
we have three notes of the chord that we can use to define it. We can play
just the root, as we've been doing, and that is sufficient; or we can play two
or three of them, if we like. Here's a bass line that does the latter: it's
the line from "Twist and Shout", which has been played by a lot of bands
including the Beatles. It also happens to be the bass line for "La Bamba" by
Ritchie Valens, by a strange twist of fate. Think of it as whichever one you
like.

   C major  F major      G major   F major

   q  e  e  e  e  e  e   e  q. e  e  e  e  e
G--------------2--5----|---------------------|
D-----2--5--3--------5-|-5--r--0--3--3--2--0-|   repeat
A--3------------------\_/--------------------|
E----------------------|---------------------|

  Cmon and shake it up baby (shake it up baby)
  Twist and Shout           (twist and shout)

You can see the outline of the C major chord in the first half-measure, just
as we wrote it above. You can also see the outline of the F major chord in the
second half of the first measure: it's the same pattern played one string
higher. For the G, we hit only one note, the root, and hold it: then we play
the root of the F chord, followed by a leading sequence back down to the C
major chord, where the phrase repeats.

You can also play two of the notes of the chord, rather than all three. The
bass line that is at the heart of almost all country music does that: it plays
the root and fifth on alternating beats.

(all notes are quarter notes)

   C major                   F major                    C major

G-------------|-------------|------------|-------5--r-|----
D-----r--5--r-|-----r--5--r-|-3--r-------|-3--r-------|----
A--3----------|--3----------|-------3--r-|------------|--3-
E-------------|-------------|------------|------------|----

It alternates root-fifth-root-fifth-root-fifth. Doesn't actually do much else,
but it does serve to outline the chord being played at all times. Because of
its simplicity and power, it's one of the most heavily used ideas for bass
lines in all of popular music; besides country music, bluegrass music, some
folk music, and occasional bits of rock and jazz use it as well. It does,
however, get boring after a while: you might like to use some leading notes to
jazz it up a little bit. One bass line that does so is the one from the song
"Wipeout" by the Beach Boys. It goes like this:

(all notes are 8th notes)

             E major

G----------|------------------------|------------------------|
D-----0--1-|-2--2--2--0--------0--1-|-2--2--2--0--------0--1-|
A--2-------|-------------2--2-------|-------------2--2-------|
E----------|------------------------|------------------------|

                                                     A major

G-------------------------|-------------------0--1-|-2--2--2--0--------0--1-|
D--2--2--2--0--------0--1-|-2--2--2--0-----2-------|-------------2--2-------|
A--------------2--2-------|-------------2----------|------------------------|
E-------------------------|------------------------|------------------------|

                            E major

G--2--2--2--0-------------|------------------------|-------------------2--3-|
D--------------2-----0--1-|-2--2--2--0--------0--1-|-2--2--2--0-----4-------|
A-----------------2-------|-------------2--2-------|-------------2----------|
E-------------------------|------------------------|------------------------|

   B major                  A major                  E major

G--4--4--4--2--------0--1-|-2--2--2--0-------------|------------------------|
D--------------4--2-------|-------------2-----0--1-|-2--2--2--0--------0--1-|
A-------------------------|----------------2-------|-------------2--2-------|
E-------------------------|------------------------|------------------------|

   B major

G-------------------------|
D--2-----------------0--1-|
A-----2--2--2--2--2-------|  repeat
E-------------------------|

This line plays the root three times, a leading note down to the fifth played
twice, and then a two-note leading sequence back to the root. It's playing
exactly the same figure under each chord: (root-root-root-lead-fifth-fifth-
lead-lead) are always played, in that order. The leading tones make it much
more driving that it would be if only roots and fifths were played: try it and
see.
   It's very common to do as this bass line does; play the same pattern under
each chord, changing the pattern up and down the fingerboard to keep the root
in the right place, but otherwise not varying the line at all. When the bass
line has this form, the pattern is often called a bass figure (or bass
pattern, or bass riff) and a lot of rock music relies heavily on such figures.
This figure is a pretty simple one: we'll run into some more simple ones later
in this lesson and into some more complex ones in later lessons.

In addition to the simple three-note chords, there are a number of four-note
chords, and also five-, six-, and seven-note chords as well. Of this vast
array of chords, only a few four-note chords are widely used outside of jazz,
and I'm only going to talk about those chords. They're made by adding one more
note onto a basic three note chord. The most commonly used four-note chord is
made by starting with a major chord and adding the note 1.5 steps above the
fifth. For example, starting with a C major chord, whose fifth is G, you would
add the note Bb, which is three half-steps above G. The following chord (which
is made of the notes C-E-G-Bb) is called a seventh chord, or a dominant chord,
and the new note is called the seventh note. You can play C7 like this:

G-----------3--
D-----2--5-----
A--3-----------
E--------------

and in general you can add the 7th note to the major scale pattern I gave
earlier, like this:

--------------------N--
-----(N-1)--(N+2)------
--N--------------------

  2   1      4      2

and get the four notes of any 7th chord you like. Seventh chords are easily
the most commonly used four-note chord. You can also make a minor seventh
chord, by starting with a minor chord instead of a major chord. For example,
the C minor 7 chord is made of the notes C, Eb, G, and Bb, and you can play
one like this:

G-----------3--
D--------5-----
A--3--6--------
E--------------

(I'll let you work out the general pattern for this one). The minor 7th chord
isn't used much in rock music (although see Gallows Pole, by Led Zeppelin, for
an interesting example of it) but it is very common in jazz music.

Another note you can add to a major chord is the note that is one whole step
above the fifth of the chord. This note is called the 6th note, and a chord
that contains it is called a 6th chord. For example, a C6 chord is made up of
the notes C, E, and G, plus the new note A (one step above G). This chord is
fingered as follows:

G-----------2--
D-----2--5-----
A--3-----------
E--------------

and it's the second most common four-note chord, after the 7th chord. The
single most widely used bass line in recorded music is based on it: if you
have ever listened to any kind of blues music, you've heard this line
somewhere. The most widely know song that uses it is probably "Johnny B.
Goode" by Chuck Berry, but there are literally thousands of songs, in all
keys, all styles and all tempos, that use it. It looks like this:

(all notes are quarter notes)

  C major 6

G-----------2-|-5--2-------|----------2-|-5--2-------|
D-----2--5----|-------5--2-|----2--5----|-------5--2-|
A--3----------|------------|-3----------|------------|
E-------------|------------|------------|------------|

  F major 6                  C major 6

G-------------|------------|----------2-|-5--2-------|
D-----------0-|-3--0-------|----2--5----|-------5--2-|
A-----0--3----|-------3--0-|-3----------|------------|
E--1----------|------------|------------|------------|

  G major 6                  C major 6

G-------------|------------|----------2-|-5--2-------|
D-----------2-|-5--2-------|----2--5----|-------5--2-|
A-----2--5----|-------5--2-|-3----------|------------|
E--3----------|------------|------------|------------|

It's based on a very simple figure: start on the root, run up the C6 chord to
the high root, then run back down again. The figure is played under three
different chords: C, F, and G, and it lasts twelve bars. The general pattern
is known as the twelve-bar blues, and it's probably the most widely used song
form in popular music. Note, for example, that Wipeout (transcribed above) is
on the same pattern, using the chords E, A, and B instead. (It uses a
different figure, but the same pattern of chords, and the same method of
repeating one figure under each chord.)

   One last point on chords in bass lines. In all of the above examples, the
first note played in each chord is the root note. Thus, we're still using the
root note to define each chord: the other notes of the chord are just helping
to flesh it out once we've already stated the main outline. Most music never
does anything else, but occasionally (most commonly in jazz) a note other than
the root will be the first (or only) note played under a given chord.
Borrowing some terms from classical music, we say that a chord is in "root
position" if the root is played first. We say that it's in "first inversion"
if the third is used to define the chord change, and in "second inversion" if
the fifth is the first note played. Second inversion is rarely used: first
inversion is usually used when playing a two-chord sequence twice in a row.
Thus, instead of playing:

   F     Bb     F     Bb

G-------------|------------|
D--------3--3-|-------3--3-|
A--1--1-------|-1--1-------|
E-------------|------------|

you might instead play:

   F     Bb     F     Bb

G-------------|------------|
D--------3--3-|-------7--7-|
A--1--1-------|-5--5-------|
E-------------|------------|

playing the chords in first inversion in the second measure, just to add
variety to the line.

For more complex chords used in jazz, you can usually play just about
any chord note you like out of them, although it's still a good idea to
start with the root note for the sake of identifying the chord. However,
for some chords, the root note doesn't sound very good under the chord;
usually this happens when another note in the chord is very dissonant
with the root. Common chords than do this include Cb5 (C flat 5) and
Cb9 (C flat 9) (or any other root note of course). In such cases you
usually do best to try first inversion, ie playing the third of the chord
on the first beat, and then moving off to either the root, or to the
dissonant note, as the case may be. I'll talk more about playing under
strange chords when I talk about scales in a later lesson.

Occasionally, a composer will specify a particular note for the bass when
writing a chord. Such chords might be referred to as "C major with an A
in the bass" which is exactly what you think - the guitar/piano plays the
C major chord but the bassist ignores that and plays the A. Chords like
that are usually written "C/A", where the letter before the slash indicates
the chord and the letter after the slash indicates the bass note. It's usually
done to give the impression that a different chord is being played. In this
example, the C major chord consists of the notes C E G ; but when the A is
added in the bass, you get the four notes A C E G which is an A minor 7th
chord. However, if the chord was written Amin7, then the guitar and piano
would probably play the A note as well, and if the composer doesn't want that
to happen for some reason, he can write "C/A" and get the desired effect.
This format can also be used to force inversions: for example, you might
see the chord "G/B" which means G major with B in the bass. This just means
that the composer wants the G chord in first inversion: you should almost
always respect the composer's wishes in such cases.

I'll end this lesson with one more (short) example of using several notes from
a chord to create a bass line. This line is based on a one-measure pattern,
and that pattern repeats, no changes, for about 5 minutes under the solos in
the middle of the song. The measure contains two chords, A minor and E7, and
each note in the line comes from one of those two chords. The song is "Light
My Fire" by the Doors, and this time I have to apologize for using a line that
was played on keyboards instead of on bass... it's too good a line to pass up!
Most bands that play this song play the line on bass anyway, so we can forgive
Mr. Manzarek some chutzpah in this case.

  A minor   E7

   q  e  e  q  e  e
G-------------------|
D--------2-----0--2-|  repeat, and repeat again!
A--0--3-----2-------|
E-------------------|

That's all there is to it, and this one measure is played for most of the
song. The first three notes are A, C, and E, the A minor chord, and the last
three notes are B, D, and E, which are the fifth, 7th, and root, respectively,
of the E7 chord.

In the next lesson I'll talk about scales, and I'll talk about what a key is,
and how the key that a song is in determines which chords are used in that
song.

Offline LovetaBass

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #29 on: August 14, 2006, 01:25:05 PM »
Yo Thomas, this is amazing.  :o   I really think that you shouild consider a hand book maybe even working with some of the more learned bass players here at LGM. You guys are really doing great for the Lord be proud b/c you make Him look good.
"Be ye Blessed and continue to be a Blessing."

Offline thomas1168

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #30 on: August 14, 2006, 05:15:36 PM »
So you’re cool with C7, right? But what happens when you see a C79 chord coming at you?

Or, worse yet, an F#b9/13 or—Jaco help you—an Eb7#9/b9? All of these chords are derived from the same scale—and it’s why, my FELLOW LGM friendS, you really need to know your way around the diminished scale.

 the diminished scale is an eight-note scale built symmetrically in a half-step, whole-step pattern.the
AS WE JUST LEARNED OUR MODES
 this time let’s look at its counterpart, the “half-whole.” Look at Ex. 1 and check out how it is constructed.

There are several “hidden” chords lurking inside the diminished scale. In addition to the C7 chord, you can also find the notes of the E7, G7, and A7 chords. There is a Cdim7 chord (C, E, G, A) contained in the scale as well as a Ddim7 chord (D, E, G, B). These two diminished chords on top of each other give this scale one of its names from the bebop era: the double-diminished scale. Most players today refer to this scale as the half-step/whole-step diminished scale.

Ex. 2 is based on the first section of the Duke Ellington standard “Caravan.” In this progression, the C79 is acting as the V chord, or the dominant sound that will eventually resolve to Fm7, the I chord, in bar 13. To get this progression in your ear, check out Oscar Pettiford with Thelonious Monk (Thelonious Monk Plays Duke Ellington, Riverside), Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers (Caravan, Riverside), or any of the original Ellington versions of the tune.

The example starts on the root, C, and moves up the diminished scale to D (the 9) on beat three in bar 2. Bar 5 moves down the scale, emphasizing the F# (the #4), E (the 3rd), and D (the 9). In bar 8, the line begins on C but moves to a descending G triad arpeggio. Beat three lands on G, and then outlines the descending G triad arpeggio again. This is a common technique: By superimposing other chords contained in the scale, like the G triad on top of the C7, you can emphasize the complex color of the diminished sound.

Bar 11 begins on the 9 and #9 (D and E) and then moves downward in a typical scale pattern in 3rds. In bar 13, the progression finally resolves to Fm7, the I chord—ah, home base. Recognize the scale on the Fm7 chord? Right—it’s the plain ol’ funky F minor blues scale.

Start slowly and learn the theory and sound of the diminished scale. Once you master this scale, you’ll have a new vocabulary at your disposal. Next time we’ll take another look at the extremely useful—but hard to deal with—minor 7 5 chord.

Offline jeremyr

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #31 on: August 14, 2006, 05:22:54 PM »
. There is a Cdim7 chord (C, E, G, A) contained in the scale as well as a Ddim7 chord (D, E, G, B).

C-E-G-A makes up the C6 chord.

C-Eb-Gb-A makes up the C Dim7 chord
Somebody put me in the key of E#

Offline thomas1168

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #32 on: August 14, 2006, 05:48:11 PM »
Y7OYR RIGHT ON JUST THE NAME THANKS FOR THE EMAIL MAN
APPRICATE YOU BRO

Offline thomas1168

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #33 on: August 14, 2006, 11:20:15 PM »
NEXT WE ARE ADVANCED CHORDS TETRA CHORDS ALTER INVERSIONNS

AND HOW TO PLAY WITH A FAKE BOOK

Offline fluteminstrel

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #34 on: August 14, 2006, 11:42:58 PM »
every one pray for me i want to learn all those thing but having a hard time understanding them in short i"m just lost need help badly never took a lesson is self taught need help badly and pray for me please thanks  ?/?

Offline jeremyr

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #35 on: August 15, 2006, 08:01:14 AM »
every one pray for me i want to learn all those thing but having a hard time understanding them in short i"m just lost need help badly never took a lesson is self taught need help badly and pray for me please thanks  ?/?

if you need additional help following what thomas is posting send me an IM and i'll help walk you through it.
Somebody put me in the key of E#

Offline thomas1168

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #36 on: August 15, 2006, 08:46:43 AM »
YOU WILL HAVE TO BUY A BEGINNER BASS PLAYER BOOK
THE THEORY THAT I AM TEACHING IS A LITTLE ADVANCED FOR A BEGINNER

YOU CAN PRAY FOR UNDERSTANDING BUT THE HARD WORK AND EFFORT IS STILL ON YOU

Offline thomas1168

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #37 on: August 15, 2006, 09:00:28 AM »
THIS IS THE END RESULT OF WHAT I AM POSTING
PLEASE DO NOT MAKE THE MISTAKE I MAKE
PUT THAT BASS DOWN FOR A MINUTE AND GET ON THAT KEYBOARD PIANO YOU CAN PLAY SCALES FOR THE NEXT 20 YEARS IF YOU ARE NOT CONNECTING
learning basic and advanced jazz theory and applying it to the piano

*Getting two or three principal jazz chord voicings "into the hands"
*Working toward automatic response to chord symbols forvoicings using flashcards and exercises.
*learning which jazz scales and modes fit which chord families
*learning swing, ballad and Latin performance styles
*building improvisation skills using MODES SCALES BROKEN CHORDS
*learning techniques and concepts about how to practice efficiently.

JAZZ AND GOSPEL ARE ALMOST IDENTICAL IN THE VOICING I CHOOSE JAZZ BECAUSE OF THE COLORFULL CHORDS

Offline Willie L. Terry Jr

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #38 on: August 15, 2006, 05:50:49 PM »
Thomas...this is heavy stuff man.  Do you know what you're doing to the these cats.  I consider myself advanced and I'm reading it like twice like the Bareans of the bible to make sure it lines up with what i've been taught.

Awesome periods of instruction.

I'm a scales, modes junky but I've been hesitant to dive into melodic minors because I can't see there application.  It's really hard to practice them to without hearing chord changes so that I can outline them.  Any advice on how to approach melodic minors?

I may be off base here but I know that aeolian is the natural minor.  When playing the major scale, I know what notes to use based on the modes and where I am in the progress i.e. If I'm on the 6th of CMaj7 I'm at A and I'd use the aeolian.  My question is what modes do we play when we playin the Cmin7.  For example, I want to know all the notes that will outline every (inversion I guess you would call it).  Or I would like to know what modes to play with the minor scale.  IS THIS WHERE YOU USE MELODIC MINORS?

Another question:  In your post you were talking about playing on other than the root (paraphrasing).  Are you speaking in terms of following the chord progression or substituting notes where the root is normally played.  If it the second idea, then I'll have to think about that and try it. 


I know I asked a lot of questions, if I had to chose one that would be a "Ah Ha" moment, it would probably be the first question.

Thanks for your help,
T.J.
Psalms 144:1  Blessed be the Lord my rock who teaches my hands to war and my FINGAZ to fight!

Offline thomas1168

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Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #39 on: August 16, 2006, 10:45:07 AM »
NO MAN THAT WHAT I AM HERE FOR QUESTIONS THE MORE I TEACH THE MORE I DISCOVER MYSELF

LISTEN MAN WHEN I FIRST STARTED PLAYING THESE CATS MOSTLY CHURCH BASSISTS SOME THAT ARE NATIONAL NOW WOULD JUST DOG ME WITH STUFF LIKE

ITS A NATURAL GIFT

I DONT KNOW WHAT I AM DOING I JUST PLAY

BASICLY NONSENSE LIES
I COULD SLAP FROM THE JUMP MY GIRLFRIEND BROTHER PLAYED WITH THE TIME JANET CHUCKII BOOKER AND WOULD TEACH ME HOW TO SLAP LIKE CRAZY ALL THE TRICKS RUNS ECT STUFF THAT I WILL BE SENDING YOU FROM THE OTHER POST BUT ANYWAY THE CHURCH GUYS THAT I WANTED TO LEARN FROM I GUESS THE WERE INTIMIDATED OR WHATEVER

SO I PROMISED MYSELF I WOULD NEVER BE LIKE THAT I WOULD SHARE
SO WITH THAT SAID


OK

PICK ANY MELODIC MINOR SCALE
BUILD A 3-4 CHORD PROGRESSION FROM THAT SCALE FOR NOW USING ONLY THE SCALE NOTES

NOW LETS SAY THE KEY OF A

PLAY AROUND THE CHORDS STAYING IN THE MELODIC SCALE
FROM YOUR 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8VA

GIVE ME A MINUTE AND I WILL WRITE A DETAILED EXPLAINATION

EXAMPLE
CHORD A C E B

NOW WHILE PLAYING THAT CHORD
PLAY AROUND AND PLAY A  THEN C THEN E THEN B
BY CHANGING THE BASS NOTE YOU CAN ADD COLOR OR INVERT THE CHORD DEPENDING ON THE APPLICATION



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