LearnGospelMusic.com Community

Please login or register.
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6   Go Down

Author Topic: Music Theory Never Stop Learning  (Read 16722 times)

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #40 on: August 16, 2006, 11:29:18 AM »
YO MAN

 lot has been written about the so called “modes “ of the Melodic Minor Scale. Although not strictly modes per say, these are really the scales that occur when you build stepwise scales from the notes of the MMS (Melodic Minor Scale). The names for these scales vary and I’m not sure it really matters what you call them but rather that you be familiar with what they are and where they can be applied. Here there are along with a few possibilities for use over chord changes.

 

·        1. C melodic minor :C-D-Eb-F-G-A-B-C

·        2- D phrygian (w natural 6th) : D-Eb-F-G-A-B-C-D

·        3- Eb lydian augmented: Eb-F-G-A-B-C-D-Eb

·        4- F lydian dominant: F-G-A-B-C-D-Eb-F

·        5- G mixolydian (w b6th): G-A-B-C-D-Eb-F-G

·        6- A aeolian (w b5): A-B-C-D-Eb-F-G-A

·        7- B altered dominant: B-C-D-Eb-F-G-A-B


Any of these scales will fit these various chords:

Cmin7, Cmin(maj7), F7(#11), D7(b9), B7(alt), Ab7(b9), Ami7(b5), Ebmaj7(#5).
As usual there are more possibilities but these are a good start. Experiment with scales and find your own ways to apply them to harmony.

Offline jeremyr

  • LGM Royalty
  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2215
  • Gender: Male
  • Callowhill fanatic
    • My Youtube Chanel

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #41 on: August 16, 2006, 11:53:05 AM »
YO MAN

 lot has been written about the so called “modes “ of the Melodic Minor Scale. Although not strictly modes per say, these are really the scales that occur when you build stepwise scales from the notes of the MMS (Melodic Minor Scale). The names for these scales vary and I’m not sure it really matters what you call them but rather that you be familiar with what they are and where they can be applied. Here there are along with a few possibilities for use over chord changes.

 

·        1. C melodic minor :C-D-Eb-F-G-A-B-C

·        2- D phrygian (w natural 6th) : D-Eb-F-G-A-B-C-D

·        3- Eb lydian augmented: Eb-F-G-A-B-C-D-Eb

·        4- F lydian dominant: F-G-A-B-C-D-Eb-F

·        5- G mixolydian (w b6th): G-A-B-C-D-Eb-F-G

·        6- A aeolian (w b5): A-B-C-D-Eb-F-G-A

·        7- B altered dominant: B-C-D-Eb-F-G-A-B


Any of these scales will fit these various chords:

Cmin7, Cmin(maj7), F7(#11), D7(b9), B7(alt), Ab7(b9), Ami7(b5), Ebmaj7(#5).
As usual there are more possibilities but these are a good start. Experiment with scales and find your own ways to apply them to harmony.

now that's what I'm talking about.  I often wondered about this and ran across these in my Jazz Theory book a couple of weeks back, but never dug into it.

Time try some of this out ;D  New scales and chords make me happy
Somebody put me in the key of E#

Offline Willie L. Terry Jr

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 323
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #42 on: August 16, 2006, 05:17:11 PM »
Thanks Thomas...Where are you located in the states?  You're taking LGM to another level.  I'm like you I share what I can.  The hunger has to be there though.

I describe like this..."I'm eating soup with a fork hungry... ;)"  Thanks peeps.  I'm going to get in my studio and break down some of these chords this weekend.

T
Psalms 144:1  Blessed be the Lord my rock who teaches my hands to war and my FINGAZ to fight!

Offline fluteminstrel

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 142
  • Gender: Male
  • my bass

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #43 on: August 16, 2006, 06:16:38 PM »
 :)

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #44 on: August 16, 2006, 06:23:46 PM »
IM IN THE ALT
VIA LA
VIA PHOENIX
VIA NEW YORK
VIA PITTSBURGH

Offline yazakar

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 54
  • The Greatest insrument alive!!!!

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #45 on: August 16, 2006, 07:45:07 PM »
i'm sorry if you think i'm a slow bass player i'm learning how to read music but i just started last year can you please explain to me the whole concept of music theory?







there is only 1 god


thx
There is only one God....

Offline jeremyr

  • LGM Royalty
  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2215
  • Gender: Male
  • Callowhill fanatic
    • My Youtube Chanel

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #46 on: August 16, 2006, 08:07:03 PM »
can you please explain to me the whole concept of music theory?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Music theory is a field of study that involves an investigation of the many diverse elements of a music, including the development and methodology for analyzing, hearing, understanding, and composing music. While musicology may include any statement, belief, or conception of or about music, music theory is limited to (1) discussions concerning synchronic (or diachronic) events of a specific composition (or compositions) and (2) abstract music-theoretic issues (e.g., set theory, group theory, tonal tension theory, etc.). A person who practices music theory is a music theorist.

Some music theorists attempt to explain the compositional techniques composers use by establishing rules and patterns. Others model the experience of listening to or performing music. Though extremely diverse in their interests and commitments, many Western music theorists are united in their belief that the acts of composing, performing, and listening to music may be explicated to a high degree of detail (this, as opposed to a conception of musical expression as fundamentally ineffable except in musical sounds). Generally, music theory works are both descriptive and prescriptive, that is they both attempt to define practice and to influence later practice. Thus, music theory generally lags behind practice in important ways, but also points towards future exploration and performance.

Performers study music theory in order to be able to understand the relationships that a composer expects to be understood in the notation, and composers study music theory in order to be able to understand how to produce effects and to structure their own works. Composers may study music theory in order to guide their precompositional and compositional decisions. Broadly speaking, music theory in the Western tradition focuses on harmony and counterpoint, and then uses these to explain large scale structure and the creation of melody.
Somebody put me in the key of E#

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #47 on: August 16, 2006, 08:36:01 PM »
YAZAKAR

NO MAN I DONT THINK ANYTHING BUT

BUT THERE ARE SOME THINGS YOU HAVE TO GET ON YOURSELF
I POSTED YOU A MESSAGE A COUPLE OF DAYS AGO GO BY A BEGGINER BASS BOOK AND STUDY IT
STUDY IT STUDY IT STUDY IT

WILLIE L POSTED AND AWSOME STATEMENT ( I AM HUNGRY)
THAT SAYS IT ALL

ARE YOU REALLY HUNGRY TO PLAY BASS
YES OR NO

MAN IF NO YOU ARE JUST WASTING TIME MAN YOU CAN BE GETTING GOOD AT SOMETHING ELSE
NOW IF YOU7 ARE HUNGRY YOU WOULD BE SAYING SOMETHING LIKE

I BOUGHT 4 BOOKS ON HOW TO PLAY BASS AND THIS BOOK SAYS THAT ?
AND I AM TRYING TO PLAY THIS?

DO YOU GO TO SCHOOL
STUDING MATH WHEN YOU START ALGEBRA YOU WILL NOT UNDERSTAND RIGHT OF THE BAT HOW TO DO COMPLEX PROBLEMS
YOU HAVE TO GO THROUGH THE STEP BY STEP PROCESS

THIS IS THE SAME I AM TEACHING ADVANCED CALCULUS SO TO SAY

MAN YOU HAVE TO LEARN HOW TO THE BASICS BASICS YOURSELF
THAT IS THE ONLY WAY YOU ARE GOING TO LEARN

NOW WHEN YOU GO AND GET SOME BASS BOOKS IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS I WILL EXPLAIN IN FULL DETAIL
BUT THYE QUESTIONS YOU ARE ASKING ARE TOO BROAD

AND THERE ARE GREAT PEOPLE ON THIS SITE THAT WILL ANSWER ANY QUESTION BLESS THEM

BUT I AM TRYING TO BE A REAL TEACHER AND YOUU ARE ONLY DOING YOURSELF A DISSERVICE BY NOT STUDING SEARCHING FOR YOURSELF
ON THAT BASIC LEVEL

ADVANCED THEORY IS A DIFFERENT THING

Offline Willie L. Terry Jr

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 323
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #48 on: August 16, 2006, 08:57:26 PM »
Thomas is serious man....   Yall cats better quit playing.

Mr. T...when I get to MY BOOK by Scott Hubbell "Fretboard Alchemy"  I'll give you quotes from it and we'll see about this melodic minor stuff.

Interesting note that I learned about using the modes with Minor Scale

The start over...

Aeolian
Locrian
Ionian
Dorian
Phrygian
Lydian
Mixolydian

This opens up more of the fretboard to me and allows me to take the relative minor to another level.  I notice something that I found on my own too.  The 3rd in the minor scale is the relative major.  Wow!  man...light bulb moment.  These are the things we bassist dream about...light bulb moments.


Keep sharing the love,
P.S. True teachers are bust you in the mouthe type teachers.

I love that...keep it up.

T.J.
Psalms 144:1  Blessed be the Lord my rock who teaches my hands to war and my FINGAZ to fight!

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #49 on: August 16, 2006, 09:08:55 PM »
TRULEY APPRICIATE YOU WILLIE
THANK YOU
THAT IS WHAT ALL THIS TYPING IS ABOUT I HAD THAT BULB MOMENT
I AM LOOKING FOR ONE MY SELF

ANOTHER GOOD BOOK SORT OF BASIC BUT I HAVE NEVER STOPPED GOING BACK TO IT
RUFUS REID THE EVOLVING BASSIST

AND WHAT I AM DOING NOW IS JU7ST WORKING OUT OF A REAL BOOK / FAKE BOOK
JUST LLOKING AT CHORD SYMBOLS AND PLAYING AND SOME OF THE JAZZ STANDARD HAVE SOME HEAVY CHORDS AND AT 145 TEMPO YOU ONLY HAVE SECONDS TO MAKE THAT CHOICE AM I GOING TO PLAT THE ROOT ONLY TH 3RD 5 6 7 SCALULAR OR CROMATIC WILL I ADD A b5 CHANGE THE CHORD ECT
ITS HARD MAN BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO THINK 16 BARS AHEAD AT ALL TIMES

AND I AM RECORDING SOME MELODIC MINOR STUFF I WILL POST IT
LISTEN TO PRINCE HE IS A MELODIC MINOR FREAK
AND HE WILL CHANGE THE WHOLE CHORD STRUCTURE UP WITH THE BASS JUST MESSING YOUR HEAD ALL UP
BUT THE SICK PART IS IT SOUNDS SO SIMPLISTIC BUT IT IS SERIOUS


Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #50 on: August 16, 2006, 09:40:57 PM »
OK WILLIE MAN

I PUT DOWN MELODIC MINOR VOCALS FOR YOU AND IT LIT A FIRE TO GET THE THING/SONG DONE WITH
NOW
NOW HERE THE TEST TELL ME WHAT CHORDS THAT I POSTED ABOVE ARE BEING SUNG (HARMONY)

http://media.learngospelmusic.com/displayimage.php?album=randon&cat94445&pos=-1826

Offline jeremyr

  • LGM Royalty
  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2215
  • Gender: Male
  • Callowhill fanatic
    • My Youtube Chanel

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #51 on: August 17, 2006, 01:00:09 AM »
Thomas is serious man....   Yall cats better quit playing.

Mr. T...when I get to MY BOOK by Scott Hubbell "Fretboard Alchemy"  I'll give you quotes from it and we'll see about this melodic minor stuff.

Interesting note that I learned about using the modes with Minor Scale

The start over...

Aeolian
Locrian
Ionian
Dorian
Phrygian
Lydian
Mixolydian

This opens up more of the fretboard to me and allows me to take the relative minor to another level.  I notice something that I found on my own too.  The 3rd in the minor scale is the relative major.  Wow!  man...light bulb moment.  These are the things we bassist dream about...light bulb moments.


Keep sharing the love,
P.S. True teachers are bust you in the mouthe type teachers.

I love that...keep it up.

T.J.


HAHAHAHA>....LIGHT BULB just went off in my head.  This works ofr Aeloian (The natural minor)HOWEVER there's a little twist with the harmonic minor and/or melodic minor modes.
Somebody put me in the key of E#

Offline Willie L. Terry Jr

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 323
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #52 on: August 17, 2006, 02:04:18 AM »
(as I'm taking notes)...Ruffus Reid "The Evolving Bassist"  - Check

Assignment - I go P&W rehearsal, Choir tonight but I'll be until about 1 a.m. Japan time. working this assignment.

T.J.



Psalms 144:1  Blessed be the Lord my rock who teaches my hands to war and my FINGAZ to fight!

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #53 on: August 17, 2006, 10:31:51 AM »
MORE ON THE MELODIC SCALES (MINOR)

The melodic scale can be represented by these notes: c, d, e, f, g, a, b.

The melodic scale is proper, and, like the diatonic scale, it is smooth with only two sizes of second (major and minor second). This makes the scale particularly suitable for melodic purposes, including improvisation. The two tonal scales which can be derived from it are, however, amongst the least effective and convincing at providing a tonic of all the tonal scales.

Two of the other modes of this scale are very familiar in jazz circles as melodic modes used as the basis for improvisation (or indeed composition) over dominant seventh type chords. These two modes are usually called the lydian dominant scale and altered scale.

These two jazz modes and the two tonal harmonic scales are listed below. They are all taken from the same melodic scale (c, d, e, f, g, a, b) and the name of each scale is listed next to its home note. It should be stressed here that neither the lydian dominant scale nor the altered scale has a tonic triad on its home note, because that is the root of the (unstable) dominant chord over which it is used. The term "home note" is used only to indicate that this note is the most convenient reference point of the scale since it matches the root of the chord over which it is used.

Home note   Name of mode
e   
f   f lydian dominant (or lydian flat 7)
c   c (ascending) melodic minor
g   g (descending) melodic major
d   
a   
b   b altered
The melodic scale above has two triads which are capable of functioning as tonics: c minor and G major, so these are the tonics of the two tonally effective modes of the melodic scale - the (ascending) melodic minor scale and the (descending) melodic major scale.

Both of these scales can be understood to be melodic "improvements" of the harmonic minor and harmonic major scales respectively, although the strength of the tonic in both these melodic scales is weaker than in their harmonic counterparts.

    
The melodic minor scale
The melodic minor scale is represented numerically (relative to the major scale):

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   Notes
                            
i   ii   III+   IV   V   vi0   vii0   Chords
So if the tonic is c, the notes and chords of this scale are:

c   d   e   f   g   a   b   Hear these notes
                            
c   d   E+   F   G   a0   b0   Hear these chords

There are semitones (minor seconds) between the 2nd and 3rd degrees and between the 7th and 8th degrees, and wholetones (major seconds) between all the other adjacent degrees. Using this formula the melodic minor scale can be built on any note.

The scale is most frequently encountered as a temporary substitution for the harmonic minor scale in order to smooth the melodic line from the sixth to the seventh degree without disturbing the tonic function on i.

In common practice classical it is rarely used in isolation for any extended period of time. This is largely because its tonic is not so effective as that of the harmonic minor scale. Repeated use of ii or IV in a minor mode tend to make the tonic sound like a slightly artificial alteration of a major tonic.

    
The melodic major scale
The melodic major scale is spelled (relative to the major scale):

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   Notes
                            
I   ii0   iii0   iv   v   VI+   VII   Chords
If c is our tonic then the notes and chords in this scale are:

c   d   e   f   g   a   b   Hear these notes
                            
C   d0   e0   f   g   A+   B   Hear these chords
It is so named because it is a mirror of the (ascending) melodic minor scale. In the melodic minor scale the 6th and 7th degrees of the diatonic aeolian mode are sharpened, in the melodic major scale the 6th and 7th degrees of the diatonic major scale are flattened.

What a strange, wonderful and under-used scale this is ! It has a very usable (if a little unstable) tonic function on I.
To me it evokes Eastern European folk melodies, with its yearning flattened sixth and its mellow and relaxed flattened seventh degree,
but it has been mostly ignored by classical composers.

Perhaps this is a reflection of the incorrect theoretical belief that the dominant (V) chord has to be major, for the I (i) to have any tonic function.
But the melodic major scale proves this to be nothing more than PERSONAL PREF.
In this scale the leading tone is not the 7 (which resolves to 1), but the 6 which resolves to fifth of the tonic triad. This leading tone is found in the subdominant (iv), so here the subdominant takes on the role that is usually taken on by the dominant in the major and minor scales. Certainly, alternating between v and I will displace the tonicity of the latter triad, but providing that iv is interposed between them, the minor dominant is fairly safe.

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #54 on: August 17, 2006, 10:35:53 AM »

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #55 on: August 17, 2006, 01:47:20 PM »
NEXT WE START THE HARMONIC SCALES
THIS WILL TAKE US IN SOME SERIOUS JAZZ
AND MOST OH THE BETTER GOSPEL OUT THERE

T

Offline jeremyr

  • LGM Royalty
  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2215
  • Gender: Male
  • Callowhill fanatic
    • My Youtube Chanel

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #56 on: August 17, 2006, 02:53:23 PM »
NEXT WE START THE HARMONIC SCALES
THIS WILL TAKE US IN SOME SERIOUS JAZZ
AND MOST OH THE BETTER GOSPEL OUT THERE

T


man you're getting after my heart now :) 

I just started digging into the Melodic MInor Scales and man you can get some TASTY passing tones from these bad boys!!!!!
Somebody put me in the key of E#

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #57 on: August 17, 2006, 03:54:13 PM »
I CAN STAY IN MELODIC

I WILL DIG SOME JAZZ UP THAT REALLY USES MELODIC

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #58 on: August 17, 2006, 03:58:50 PM »
I CALL THESE JAZZ SCALES

Dorian Flat 2
Lydian Sharp 5
Mixolydian Sharp 4
Mixolydian Flat 6
Minor Flat 5
Locrian Flat 4

What Is A Jazz Scale?

Jazz scales are used by improvisers to convey complex harmonies common in Jazz.

The names of the jazz scales imply that they are based on the modes, with certain scale degrees altered. If you know the modes you can learn the jazz scales.

The jazz scales are based on the ascending melodic minor scale. Just as the modes were based on the major scale starting on different scale degrees, the jazz scales are based on the melodic minor scale, starting on different scale degrees

Offline thomas1168

  • LGM Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 333
  • Gender: Male

Re: Music Theory Never Stop Learning
« Reply #59 on: August 17, 2006, 04:03:27 PM »
PLEASE NOTE SOME OF THE SCALES I WILL BE REPEATING OVER AND OVER
SO DONT GET CONFUSSED

IE MIXOLYDIAN b6
USED IN JAZZ GOSPEL YOU NAME IT VERY POPULAR MODE/SCALE

I CALL IT A JAZZ SCALE

I FIND IT IS EASY FOR NE TO CLASSIFY THEM
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6   Go Up