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Author Topic: The Voice...  (Read 2189 times)

Offline 2KlubKlarity

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The Voice...
« on: May 10, 2007, 09:57:14 AM »
Well this just me blabbing on again about the voice...

Knowing your voice is key. All growing up, I thought I was an alto. I learned alto in church and then I started getting into my voice training and lessons and then my teachers began realizing I am a lyric soprano ( which is like Jessye Norman- big, strong, heavy, yet soprano voice which is good for long arias). Over the past few years of singing in this voice, my lower range has become what they say managable, but it isn't like it used to be, which was out of control and my throat was always hurting. Alot of church and gospel singers are singing the "wrong", which is damaging in the long run. All that shouting and screaming I did in church to get that "loud" sound to go over the drummer, sort of hurt me because myself had gotten used to singing from the throat.......which is allllllllll wrong! So, with this said, I feel it is my mission to incoporate correct vocal training into the church/gospel singing, but I just got to figure out a way. :P ;D.

I'm working on it :D! Thanks for reading!

Be blessed
"Prayer is the key. Faith unlocks the door."

Offline 1voice

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2007, 09:44:59 PM »
when you do,please let me know,cause we have the same problem in my male chorus,i have come to realize all that grouling,and trying to go over the musicians,is not good.We are always trying to get our musicians to play softer,and boy thats a job to them,but we're working on it. But again,please let me know,i would love to be able to do the same thin g.Alot of gospel singers haven't had any formal training,and end up doing alot of damage like you said.

So be blessed,and holla.. ;) :D ;D
Let your voice, be one voice, to Glorify the Lord.

oldskoolgospel

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2007, 06:45:42 PM »
Interesting...

Offline Desuree

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2007, 02:01:36 AM »
You seem to really know what you are talking about. Where can you go to actually find a good vocal coach? How do you know if you are singing incorrectly? I dont have any formal vocal training and I'm an inspiring gospel artist out of the Dallas, TX area. I want to start on my freshman album however I want to make sure I have the skills down before I spend money and time in the studio. I need help girl. Could you point a sister in the right direction. Thanks

Offline LyricTenor

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2007, 07:50:02 AM »
Well this just me blabbing on again about the voice...

Knowing your voice is key. All growing up, I thought I was an alto. I learned alto in church and then I started getting into my voice training and lessons and then my teachers began realizing I am a lyric soprano ( which is like Jessye Norman- big, strong, heavy, yet soprano voice which is good for long arias). Over the past few years of singing in this voice, my lower range has become what they say managable, but it isn't like it used to be, which was out of control and my throat was always hurting. Alot of church and gospel singers are singing the "wrong", which is damaging in the long run. All that shouting and screaming I did in church to get that "loud" sound to go over the drummer, sort of hurt me because myself had gotten used to singing from the throat.......which is allllllllll wrong! So, with this said, I feel it is my mission to incoporate correct vocal training into the church/gospel singing, but I just got to figure out a way. :P ;D.

I'm working on it :D! Thanks for reading!

Be blessed

Yo 2Kute, bless ya boy with some knowledge on this whole "lyric" thing.  You can tell from my screen name what I am, I have NO CLUE as to what it means though.  Get at me.   ;)

Offline Maestro87

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2007, 10:00:58 AM »
I need to maka a clarification.  A Lyric Soprano is someone with a lighter voice and normally more agile.  From the description 2KlubKlarity gave, it sounds like she is a Dramatic Soprano not a Lyric Soprano.  Normally when an Alto becomes a soprano due to proper training she becomes either a Mezzo-Soprano or a Dramatic Soprano.  I am a college student and I live in the Arlington area and I train a couple of high school singers.  I would be happy to give you some tips oldskoolgospel.  I specialize in Vocal Pedagogy and Vocal health and rehabilitation.
Well this just me blabbing on again about the voice...

Knowing your voice is key. All growing up, I thought I was an alto. I learned alto in church and then I started getting into my voice training and lessons and then my teachers began realizing I am a lyric soprano ( which is like Jessye Norman- big, strong, heavy, yet soprano voice which is good for long arias). Over the past few years of singing in this voice, my lower range has become what they say managable, but it isn't like it used to be, which was out of control and my throat was always hurting. Alot of church and gospel singers are singing the "wrong", which is damaging in the long run. All that shouting and screaming I did in church to get that "loud" sound to go over the drummer, sort of hurt me because myself had gotten used to singing from the throat.......which is allllllllll wrong! So, with this said, I feel it is my mission to incoporate correct vocal training into the church/gospel singing, but I just got to figure out a way. :P ;D.

I'm working on it :D! Thanks for reading!

Be blessed
"Stay Fly, Stay Fresh, God Bless"
Dameron Growe

Offline LyricTenor

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2007, 01:59:28 PM »
I need to maka a clarification.  A Lyric Soprano is someone with a lighter voice and normally more agile.  From the description 2KlubKlarity gave, it sounds like she is a Dramatic Soprano not a Lyric Soprano.  Normally when an Alto becomes a soprano due to proper training she becomes either a Mezzo-Soprano or a Dramatic Soprano.  I am a college student and I live in the Arlington area and I train a couple of high school singers.  I would be happy to give you some tips oldskoolgospel.  I specialize in Vocal Pedagogy and Vocal health and rehabilitation.

Umm...I don't recall oldskoolgospel asking for tips.  I KNOW I did though, so could ya "share the wealth"?   ;) :D

Offline Maestro87

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2007, 03:33:40 PM »
No Problem.  What do you want to know?
"Stay Fly, Stay Fresh, God Bless"
Dameron Growe

Offline MusiqB77

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2007, 12:25:14 AM »
I have been working on a vocal technique for a while now called Speech Level Singing. This technique aims to help vocalists sing with the same ease as if they were just talking. This techniques frees the voice from strain and muscle tension in the throat, and allows the vocal cords to "zip" up the higher you sing, placing your vocal cords in the positioning for the notes you are desiring to sing. A good analogy is a car shifting gears. When your are driving a car in first gear, where are certain speeds that fit naturally in that gear, but if you try to go faster than that gear is made for, it becomes damaging. It's the same with  the voice. Each voice register has a different vocal cord positioning and a different resonating cavity. Lets make chest voice first gear.  In your chest voice (the voice register gospel singers use most of the time), there are certain notes that fit naturally. In gospel music, what causes the problems is when we attempt to pull chest voice up, and sing notes that really belong in our "mix" voice (second gear) or head voice (third gear). Thats like trying to drive 70 mph while in first gear. Speech Level Singing has helped me to understand how my voice works. Instead of fighting the voice when it tries naturally shift gears, just breathe and let it go. Don't hold your breath back with your throat muscles. Support (keep your ribs expanded and your diaphragm contracted) and relax the throat. I hope this was a help and wasn't confusing. Just let me know if anyone has questions.
Seven days without prayer makes one weak.

Offline LyricTenor

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2007, 08:32:29 AM »
Ok, keep going.  You have my attention.

Offline sjonathan02

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2007, 08:42:28 AM »

I have been working on a vocal technique for a while now called Speech Level Singing.

This technique aims to help vocalists sing with the same ease as if they were just talking. This techniques frees the voice from strain and muscle tension in the throat, and allows the vocal cords to "zip" up the higher you sing, placing your vocal cords in the positioning for the notes you are desiring to sing.

A good analogy is a car shifting gears. When your are driving a car in first gear, where are certain speeds that fit naturally in that gear, but if you try to go faster than that gear is made for, it becomes damaging. It's the same with  the voice. Each voice register has a different vocal cord positioning and a different resonating cavity. Lets make chest voice first gear. 

In your chest voice (the voice register gospel singers use most of the time), there are certain notes that fit naturally. In gospel music, what causes the problems is when we attempt to pull chest voice up, and sing notes that really belong in our "mix" voice (second gear) or head voice (third gear). Thats like trying to drive 70 mph while in first gear. Speech Level Singing has helped me to understand how my voice works.


Instead of fighting the voice when it tries naturally shift gears, just breathe and let it go. Don't hold your breath back with your throat muscles. Support (keep your ribs expanded and your diaphragm contracted) and relax the throat. I hope this was a help and wasn't confusing. Just let me know if anyone has questions.
Despite our communication technology, no invention is as effective as the sound of the human voice.

Offline LyricTenor

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2007, 09:52:06 AM »
I have been working on a vocal technique for a while now called Speech Level Singing.

This technique aims to help vocalists sing with the same ease as if they were just talking. This techniques frees the voice from strain and muscle tension in the throat, and allows the vocal cords to "zip" up the higher you sing, placing your vocal cords in the positioning for the notes you are desiring to sing.

A good analogy is a car shifting gears. When your are driving a car in first gear, where are certain speeds that fit naturally in that gear, but if you try to go faster than that gear is made for, it becomes damaging. It's the same with  the voice. Each voice register has a different vocal cord positioning and a different resonating cavity. Lets make chest voice first gear. 

In your chest voice (the voice register gospel singers use most of the time), there are certain notes that fit naturally. In gospel music, what causes the problems is when we attempt to pull chest voice up, and sing notes that really belong in our "mix" voice (second gear) or head voice (third gear). Thats like trying to drive 70 mph while in first gear. Speech Level Singing has helped me to understand how my voice works.


Instead of fighting the voice when it tries naturally shift gears, just breathe and let it go. Don't hold your breath back with your throat muscles. Support (keep your ribs expanded and your diaphragm contracted) and relax the throat. I hope this was a help and wasn't confusing. Just let me know if anyone has questions.


Is this a long & drawn-out "AHEM?"  *quirks eyebrow*

Offline Mysteryman

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2007, 04:37:13 PM »
I have been working on a vocal technique for a while now called Speech Level Singing. This technique aims to help vocalists sing with the same ease as if they were just talking. This techniques frees the voice from strain and muscle tension in the throat, and allows the vocal cords to "zip" up the higher you sing, placing your vocal cords in the positioning for the notes you are desiring to sing. A good analogy is a car shifting gears. When your are driving a car in first gear, where are certain speeds that fit naturally in that gear, but if you try to go faster than that gear is made for, it becomes damaging. It's the same with  the voice. Each voice register has a different vocal cord positioning and a different resonating cavity. Lets make chest voice first gear.  In your chest voice (the voice register gospel singers use most of the time), there are certain notes that fit naturally. In gospel music, what causes the problems is when we attempt to pull chest voice up, and sing notes that really belong in our "mix" voice (second gear) or head voice (third gear). Thats like trying to drive 70 mph while in first gear. Speech Level Singing has helped me to understand how my voice works. Instead of fighting the voice when it tries naturally shift gears, just breathe and let it go. Don't hold your breath back with your throat muscles. Support (keep your ribs expanded and your diaphragm contracted) and relax the throat. I hope this was a help and wasn't confusing. Just let me know if anyone has questions.

I was reading up on that online a while back. Sounds like a plan.
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Offline MusiqB77

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Re: The Voice...
« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2007, 08:45:55 PM »
I'm sorry it took so long for me to reply. I actually ordered a singing program called "Singing Success" by Brett Manning that teaches you this technique thoroughly. It's a little pricey, but it's worth the investment.
Seven days without prayer makes one weak.
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