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Author Topic: Chord Chart  (Read 10419 times)

Offline Blessingss

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Re: Chord Chart
« Reply #20 on: September 02, 2011, 07:40:33 AM »
Here is an updated chord list that includes just about every chord there is to play:


Chord Chart


*( ) = optional notes & examples using C root

Major = 1-3-5 (Cmaj, C, or CM = C-E-G)

5 (power chord = 1-5 (C5 = C-G)

Minor = 1-b3-5 (Cm = C-Eb-G)

Diminished / Minor (b5) = 1-b3-b5 (Cdim or Cm b5 = C-Eb-Gb)

Augmented / Major (#5) = 1-3-#5 (Caug or C #5 = C-E-G#)

Sus2 = 1-2-5 (Csus2 or C2 = C-D-G)

Sus4 = 1-4-5 (Csus4 = C-F-G)

6 = 1-3-5-6 (C6, Cmaj6, or CM6 = C-E-G-A)

Minor 6th  = 1-b3-5-6 (Cm6 = C-Eb-G-A)

Dominant 6/9 = 1-3-5-6-9 (C 6/9 or C6add9 = C-E-G-A-D)

Minor 6/9 = 1-b3-(5)-6-9 (Cm 6/9 = C-Eb-G-A-D)

Major 7th  = 1-3-5-7 (Cmaj7 or CM7 = C-E-G-B)

Major 7th (#5) = 1-3-#5-7 (CM7 #5 = C-E-G#-B)

Minor 7th  = 1-b3-5-b7 (Cm7 = C-Eb-G-Bb)

Minor 7th  (b5) / half-diminished 7th = 1-b3-b5-b7 (Cm7 (b5) = C-Eb-Gb-Bb)

Minor/Major 7th = 1-b3-5-7 (CmM7 = C-Eb-G-B)

Dominant 7th sus4 = 1-4-5-b7 (C7sus4 = C-F-G-Bb)

Dominant 7th  = 1-3-(5)-b7 (C7 or Cdom = C-E-G-Bb)

Dominant 7th  (b5) = 1-3-b5-b7 (C7 b5 = C-E-Gb-Bb)

Dominant 7th  (#5) = 1-3-#5-b7 (C7 #5 = C-E-G#-Bb)

Dominant 7th  (b9) = 1-3-(5)-b7-b9 (C7 b9 = C-E-G-Bb-Db)

Dominant 7th  (#9) = 1-3-(5)-b7-#9 (C7 b9 = C-E-G-Bb-D#)

Dominant 7th  (b5/b9) = 1-(3)-b5-b7-b9 (C7 b5/b9 = C-E-Gb-Bb-Db)

Dominant 7th  (#5/b9) = 1-(3)-#5-b7-b9 (C7 #5/b9 = C-E-G#-Bb-Db)

Dominant 7th  (b9/#11) = 1-(3)-(5)-b7-b9-#11 (C7 b9/#11 = C-E-G-Bb-Db-F)

Dominant 7th  (#11) = 1-(3)-(5)-b7-9-#11 (C7 #11 = C-E-G-Bb-D-F#)

Dominant 7/6 = 1-3-(5)-6-b7 (C7add6 = C-E-G-A-Bb)

Dominant 7/13 = 1-3-(5)-b7-13 (C 7/13 = C-E-G-Bb-A)

Diminished 7th  / Fully Diminished = 1-b3-b5-bb7 (Cdim7 = C-Eb-Gb-Bbb)

Add9 = 1-3-5-9 or 1-2-3-5 (Cadd9 = C-E-G-D or C-D-E-G)

Minor Add9 = 1-b3-(5)-9 (Cm9 = C-Eb-G-D)

Major 9th  = 1-3-(5)-7-9 (Cmaj9 or CM7add9 = C-E-G-B-D)

Minor 9th  = 1-b3-5-b7-9 (Cm9 = C-Eb-G-Bb-D)

Minor/Major 9th = 1-b3-(5)-7-9 (CmM9 = C-Eb-G-B-D)

Dominant 9th  = 1-3-(5)-b7-9 (C9 = C-E-G-Bb-D)

Dominant 9th  (b5)= 1-(3)-b5-b7-9 (C9 b5 = C-E-Gb-Bb-D)

Dominant 9th  (#5) = 1-(3)-#5-b7-9 (C9 #5 = C-E-G#-Bb-D)

Dominant 9/6 = 1-(3)-(5)-6-b7-9 (C 9/6 or C9add6 = C-E-G-A-Bb-D)

Dominant 9th (#11) = 1-3-(5)-b7-9-#11 (C9 #11 = C-E-G-Bb-D-F#)

Major 11th = 1-(3)-5-7-(9)-11 (Cmaj11, CM11, or CM7add11 = C-E-G-B-D-F)

Minor 11th = 1-b3-(5)-b7-(9)-11 (Cm11 = C-Eb-G-Bb-D-F)

Dominant 11th = 1-(3)-5-b7-(9)-11 (C11 or C7add11 = C-E-G-Bb-D-F)

Dominant 11th (b9) = 1-(3)-(5)-b7-b9-11 (C11 or C7add11 = C-E-G-Bb-Db-F)

Major 13th = 1-3-(5)-7-(9)-(11)-13 (CM13 or CM7add13 = C-E-G-B-D-F-A)

Minor 13th = 1-b3-(5)-b7-(9)-(11)-13 (Cm13 = C-Eb-G-Bb-D-F-A)

Dominant 13th  = 1-3-(5)-b7-(9)-(11)-13 (C13 or CM7add13 = C-E-G-Bb-D-F-A)

Dominant 13th (b9) = 1-(3)-(5)-b7-b9-(11)-13 (C13 b9 = C-E-G-Bb-Db-F-A)

Dominant 13th (b5/b9) = (1)-(3)-b5-b7-b9-(11)-13 (C13 b5/b9 = C-E-Gb-Bb-Db-F-A)

Dominant 13th (b9/#11) = (1)-(3)-(5)-b7-b9-#11-13 (C13 b9/#11 = C-E-G-Bb-Db-F#-A)

Dominant 13th (#11) = 1-(3)-(5)-b7-(9)-#11-13 (C13 #11 = C-E-G-Bb-D-F#-A)


Well I've got another sin to confess; 'was kinda lazy to enter into this practice room but ever since I've started a couple of days ago, I'm having a chording breakthrough. What I plan to do (which I've already started) is take one or two new chords and find a place for them in playing till comfortable then another one, two or something, its another great moment.

As I continued with practice, some thoughts and questions came:

I know that basically for example: the following chords can be used like
I Major
ii minor
iii minor
IV Major
V Major
vi minor
vii diminished

1. Does this mean any chord that has major, minor, or diminished in its name can basically be used in those areas e.g. m9, m11, M13, b5b9, e.t.c

2. Is there any theory page some where that teaches all basic chord functions like above and beyond for chords such as:

sus2 chord
sus4 chord
6th chord
6/9 chord
quartal chord ;D
#5#9 e.t.c


I'm having trouble with googling most of the above.

All contributions will be a blessing.
Worship

Offline T-Block

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Re: Chord Chart
« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2011, 04:23:19 PM »
1. Does this mean any chord that has major, minor, or diminished in its name can basically be used in those areas e.g. m9, m11, M13, b5b9, e.t.c

Yes. Diminished chords will have a b5 in the chord symbol. Just remember to use your ears to make sure it sounds good. Just because it can be used doesn't necessarily mean it should be. Just pick something that works and keep it moving.


2. Is there any theory page some where that teaches all basic chord functions like above and beyond for chords such as:

sus2 chord
sus4 chord
6th chord
6/9 chord
quartal chord ;D
#5#9 e.t.c

I'm sure there are various theory posts and song posts that have these chords in them. Here's a quick and dirty explanation for those chords above:

Quote
The sus2 and sus4 chords are merely major chords with the 3rd switched to those scale degrees mentioned. So, anywhere a major chord is used, try to substitute with one of those.

The 6th chord is basically a major chord with an added 6th. Same application as the above chords.

The 6/9 chord is just a major chord with an added 6th and 9th. Same application as the above chords.

Quartal chords are just chords where every note is a 4th apart. U can also substitute those for major chords.

The #5/#9 chord is an augmented type chord. You can substitute this with any dominant chord.

Your ear will (should) be the final judge on what chord to use when. It's up to you to practice and experiment to find out what works and what doesn't work. Anyone else with some inputs, go right ahead and add (or correct) what i've posted.
Real musicians play in every key!!!
Music Theory, da numbers work!

Offline Blessingss

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Re: Chord Chart
« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2011, 03:01:16 AM »
That was loud & clear T, thank you so much. I will be continuing with practice, so I'll come at any time for more questions.
Worship

Offline Blessingss

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Re: Chord Chart
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2011, 04:04:10 AM »
That was loud & clear T, thank you so much. I will be continuing with practice, so I'll come at any time for more questions.

Can someone share with me how do you experiment with chords such that you would integrate them to elements such as:

a) Zip chord (7-3-6-2-5-1-4)

b) secondary dominants (more info here please) not yet fully grasped the concept though much interested

c) chromatic progression

Yes I've heard much of "use what sounds good to you" and now my question now is: What sounds good to anybody based on the examples above and may be beyond.
Worship

Offline musallio

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Re: Chord Chart
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2011, 03:21:23 PM »
Can someone share with me how do you experiment with chords such that you would integrate them to elements such as:

a) Zip chord (7-3-6-2-5-1-4)

b) secondary dominants (more info here please) not yet fully grasped the concept though much interested

c) chromatic progression

Yes I've heard much of "use what sounds good to you" and now my question now is: What sounds good to anybody based on the examples above and may be beyond.


Due to time constraints I'll attempt to answer whatever I can now and I know someone will complete whatever I am not able to answer.

a) on the circle: there are many posts here which cover the various things you can do with various chords. Please look up posts by DaNatiMaestro to see practical examples.
Here is one of the many examples I am talking about and I have directly benefited from:

http://www.learngospelmusic.com/forums/index.php/topic,78650.0.html

I am reluctant to start new threads on the circle because there are so many and I would not want them to be forgotten just because they are old.
I have my own way of experimenting with various chords in the circle [ if you search for some of my really old posts on progressions, you will see that I used to assign numbers and name the chords in the progressions- that was my way of analysing how and where each chord can be used ;)

An example of one of my all time favourites is the minor 9th chord, as below [just an extract]:


Circle of 4ths  I like he grand piano voice  on this. It sounds great with many voices though

Key of Cb
7- Bb/  Ab-C-Db-F  [Bbm9]
3- Eb/ G-C-Db-F  [just drop the thumb from the Ab to the G]
6- Ab/ Gb-Bb-Cb-Eb  [Abm9]
2- Db/ F-Bb-Cb-Eb
5- Gb/Fb-Ab-Bb-Db  [notice how this becomes a DOM9  -GbDom9]
1- Cb/Gb-Bb-Db-Eb  [Cbmaj9]  or Cb/ Ab-Db-Gb

from here you have many options:
You can swipe your RH across all the black notes and hit the Gb note to end; or/ and
You can play the 4th.
Again, there are tons of things you can do with the 4th [I'll list those I can think from the top of my head]:

1) Play a quartal that will lead you to a specific song or to continue the circle.

so in this specific key, the quartal would be:

 4- Fb/ Ab-Db-Gb  or Fb/ Bb-Eb-Ab  or Fb/Db-Gb-Cb

2) if you want to continue with the 4th, you can explore with other chords, eg

Fb/ C-Fb-Ab  [or Caug with 3 bass], if the C note sounds off to you, you can lower it to the Cb to make it an E triad
from there you can continue with the circle and play something like

A/B-C#-E-A#  and so on...

I have not mentioned trying out a variation of inversions of the same chords here- so it's literally impossible to say you have mastered this progression until you can pull off a couple of the tricks I've just brushed on.

About  chromatic progressions:

Again, I can only give one example. I know chromatic progressions are on top of my favorites list as well.

Nowadays, you will come many gospel songs that use a chromatic progression- i assign you the task to go and find some of those songs.

For example, you will find the song uses a descending bass from the 1 to the 5. a 1 to the 2 ascending is also nice. a 4 to the 5 is common. a 6 to the 5 sounds great.

You will pick up the examples I've given by listening to the bass [99% of the time].
Why do I say 99% of the time?
because if you look at the 7-3-6-2... example I just gave above, you will notice that the RH thumb moved chromatically from Ab to Fb 8)
I would like you to play that progression again now and listen for the descending chromatic progression produced by the thumb alone- do you hear now that the 7-3-6... is given it's rich qualities [as opposed to the mere bass note :o], one of those qualities in this particular example is the chromatic descending.

Just like the circle of 4th, I would encourage you to search for "chromatic" because I know I have posted several examples of chromatic progressions.

I just sat down to come up with this one.
Something to note about chromatic progressions:

The effectiveness will be determined by the voice you use, for example, I used strings to come up with the progression I'm about to share below. I don't know how it will sound with other voices- it's up to you to explore:
[Brackets mean the note is optional]

Gb/ Db-Gb-Bb
F/ Db-F-(Ab)-Bb
E-Ab/ Db-E-Gb-Bb
Eb/Cb-Eb-Gb-Bb
D/ Eb-Gb-Ab-Db
Db-Ab-Cb/ Eb-Gb-Ab-Db
C-Ab-Bb/ Eb-Gb-Bb
Cb/ Bb-Eb-Ab
Bb/ Ab-Db-Gb
A/ G-Db-Eb-Gb
Ab/ Db-F-Gb-Cb
G-Db-F/ Ab-C-F
Gb-(Ab)/ Db-F-Bb

(repeat)

That sounds like something I would like to play during intercession, preaching of a "serious" message or altar call. I would play my RH from centre of the keyboard and my LH just above.

I hope his helps a bit.
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Offline Blessingss

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Re: Chord Chart
« Reply #25 on: September 19, 2011, 08:41:58 AM »
Due to time constraints I'll attempt to answer whatever I can now and I know someone will complete whatever I am not able to answer.

a) on the circle: there are many posts here which cover the various things you can do with various chords. Please look up posts by DaNatiMaestro to see practical examples.
Here is one of the many examples I am talking about and I have directly benefited from:

http://www.learngospelmusic.com/forums/index.php/topic,78650.0.html

I am reluctant to start new threads on the circle because there are so many and I would not want them to be forgotten just because they are old.
I have my own way of experimenting with various chords in the circle [ if you search for some of my really old posts on progressions, you will see that I used to assign numbers and name the chords in the progressions- that was my way of analysing how and where each chord can be used ;)

An example of one of my all time favourites is the minor 9th chord, as below [just an extract]:


Circle of 4ths  I like he grand piano voice  on this. It sounds great with many voices though

Key of Cb
7- Bb/  Ab-C-Db-F  [Bbm9]
3- Eb/ G-C-Db-F  [just drop the thumb from the Ab to the G]
6- Ab/ Gb-Bb-Cb-Eb  [Abm9]
2- Db/ F-Bb-Cb-Eb
5- Gb/Fb-Ab-Bb-Db  [notice how this becomes a DOM9  -GbDom9]
1- Cb/Gb-Bb-Db-Eb  [Cbmaj9]  or Cb/ Ab-Db-Gb

from here you have many options:
You can swipe your RH across all the black notes and hit the Gb note to end; or/ and
You can play the 4th.
Again, there are tons of things you can do with the 4th [I'll list those I can think from the top of my head]:

1) Play a quartal that will lead you to a specific song or to continue the circle.

so in this specific key, the quartal would be:

 4- Fb/ Ab-Db-Gb  or Fb/ Bb-Eb-Ab  or Fb/Db-Gb-Cb

2) if you want to continue with the 4th, you can explore with other chords, eg

Fb/ C-Fb-Ab  [or Caug with 3 bass], if the C note sounds off to you, you can lower it to the Cb to make it an E triad
from there you can continue with the circle and play something like

A/B-C#-E-A#  and so on...

I have not mentioned trying out a variation of inversions of the same chords here- so it's literally impossible to say you have mastered this progression until you can pull off a couple of the tricks I've just brushed on.

About  chromatic progressions:

Again, I can only give one example. I know chromatic progressions are on top of my favorites list as well.

Nowadays, you will come many gospel songs that use a chromatic progression- i assign you the task to go and find some of those songs.

For example, you will find the song uses a descending bass from the 1 to the 5. a 1 to the 2 ascending is also nice. a 4 to the 5 is common. a 6 to the 5 sounds great.

You will pick up the examples I've given by listening to the bass [99% of the time].
Why do I say 99% of the time?
because if you look at the 7-3-6-2... example I just gave above, you will notice that the RH thumb moved chromatically from Ab to Fb 8)
I would like you to play that progression again now and listen for the descending chromatic progression produced by the thumb alone- do you hear now that the 7-3-6... is given it's rich qualities [as opposed to the mere bass note :o], one of those qualities in this particular example is the chromatic descending.

Just like the circle of 4th, I would encourage you to search for "chromatic" because I know I have posted several examples of chromatic progressions.

I just sat down to come up with this one.
Something to note about chromatic progressions:

The effectiveness will be determined by the voice you use, for example, I used strings to come up with the progression I'm about to share below. I don't know how it will sound with other voices- it's up to you to explore:
[Brackets mean the note is optional]

Gb/ Db-Gb-Bb
F/ Db-F-(Ab)-Bb
E-Ab/ Db-E-Gb-Bb
Eb/Cb-Eb-Gb-Bb
D/ Eb-Gb-Ab-Db
Db-Ab-Cb/ Eb-Gb-Ab-Db
C-Ab-Bb/ Eb-Gb-Bb
Cb/ Bb-Eb-Ab
Bb/ Ab-Db-Gb
A/ G-Db-Eb-Gb
Ab/ Db-F-Gb-Cb
G-Db-F/ Ab-C-F
Gb-(Ab)/ Db-F-Bb

(repeat)

That sounds like something I would like to play during intercession, preaching of a "serious" message or altar call. I would play my RH from centre of the keyboard and my LH just above.

I hope his helps a bit.


Wow, thank you so much I'll be working on those this week :)
Worship

Offline Drivers68

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Re: Chord Chart
« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2019, 09:34:49 AM »
Thank you so much for all the work you put in to help us get to that next level. I am grateful for the things you have posted.
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