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How do gospel drummers feel about the recent rise in "Gospel" gear?

I love it! It's about time...
I play what I like. It won't change my opinion.
I'm changing out my whole setup because I'm a "Gospel" drummer.
Where were they 15, 10, 5 years ago?
It's a blatant display of disrespect and exploitation of the Gospel.
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Author Topic: "Gospel" Gear  (Read 2464 times)

Offline fLaT-fIfTh

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"Gospel" Gear
« on: July 08, 2009, 12:21:45 PM »
How do you feel, LGM? I'm curious...

God bless ;)

Offline JFunky

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2009, 08:21:29 AM »
...I think its cool.  I remember growing up playing "Rock" cymbals and "Rock" drums (standard sizes/square) that were uncomfortable and not suitable for playing in the temple.  With companies targetting gospel drummers, my opinion is that churches/g. drummers will at least have good gear to compliment the music that's being played in the urban community.


...so, you have gospel sticks, gospel cymbals and a few gospel snares.

...flat, when are you bringing out the first "Gospel drumset?"  :o ;) :D


Sidenote - A lot of cats may not tell you this but I personally want to say thanks to you for all of the hard work you're putting in and for pursuing that Vision and that feeling you have in your heart to "educate" your fellow musicians.  Keep up the great work.

...the same goes out to "4hisglory" wherever he's at... ;D
Psalms 144.1 - "Praise be to the LORD my Rock, who trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle."

Offline fLaT-fIfTh

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2009, 08:48:08 AM »
...I think its cool.  I remember growing up playing "Rock" cymbals and "Rock" drums (standard sizes/square) that were uncomfortable and not suitable for playing in the temple.  With companies targetting gospel drummers, my opinion is that churches/g. drummers will at least have good gear to compliment the music that's being played in the urban community.


...so, you have gospel sticks, gospel cymbals and a few gospel snares.

...flat, when are you bringing out the first "Gospel drumset?"  :o ;) :D


Sidenote - A lot of cats may not tell you this but I personally want to say thanks to you for all of the hard work you're putting in and for pursuing that Vision and that feeling you have in your heart to "educate" your fellow musicians.  Keep up the great work.

...the same goes out to "4hisglory" wherever he's at... ;D

Thanks JFunky!

Are you aware that many of these companies are putting zero dollars ($0.00) into R&D for their "Gospel" products? Be careful, JFunky. You may STILL be playing "Rock" cymbals. LOL

God bless ;)

Offline JFunky

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2009, 08:57:16 AM »
Thanks JFunky!

Are you aware that many of these companies are putting zero dollars ($0.00) into R&D for their "Gospel" products? Be careful, JFunky. You may STILL be playing "Rock" cymbals. LOL

God bless ;)


...no I was not!  Interesting...  Enlighten me *off the record*
Psalms 144.1 - "Praise be to the LORD my Rock, who trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle."

Offline k_denmark2

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2009, 11:20:17 AM »
Some of it's cool. But I play what I like not because of a title or category. But it is great the God and Gospel music and drummers are now being noticed and respect by these major companies!
Play Hard, Pray Harder

Offline min_amw

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2009, 02:51:51 PM »
I play what I need for the job. If I don't have it, I'll buy it, borrow it, or "create" it. I never make purchases on gear because of a name, title, or generalization. Seeing this outbreak of "gospel" gear is kinda dumb to me though. It's cool to recognize the genre and the players, but every drummer's needs is different and shouldn't be boxed into a category like everything in the category is guaranteed to work for all those who play that genre of music. Idk....
Love God. Live Long.

Offline BigFoot_BigThumb

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2009, 02:54:31 PM »
It's just another form of repackaging and marketing.  And I wonder if the cost is higher.  My kit has worked fine and has played all types of music.  Nobody said "you need some gospel sounding cymbals" or "those heads sound too rock-like."  I really think it all comes down to each individual players personal selections and research of what they buy to mold their sound.  I chose my gear based upon the ability to be versatile and adaptable to the playing situation presented to me.  For instance, I have an old aluminum shell Slingerland snare that I've owned for about 28 years now.  I use it whenever I need an old school sound, and tune it accordingly.  But it also has worked on the latest Top 40 joint.

The only exception to the rule IMO is Callowhill bass guitars.  The owner is an LGM member, and when it came to R&D he consulted and worked with actual gospel players and built his product to their specs.  He may not be a household name, but his product is true to it's calling yet it remains versatile for jazz, and I'm sure some R&B. 

I'm waiting on someone to come out with a new "Gospel" piano. 
When you've done your very best, do even better.

Offline betnich

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2009, 03:39:54 PM »
I'm waiting on someone to come out with a new "Gospel" piano. 

If they do, hope it doesn't have a Transpose button.

 :P

Offline BigFoot_BigThumb

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2009, 06:58:08 PM »
If they do, hope it doesn't have a Transpose button.

 :P

That will be one of it's most touted features.
When you've done your very best, do even better.

Offline BEATBOXERZ

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2009, 05:39:32 PM »
I play what I need for the job. If I don't have it, I'll buy it, borrow it, or "create" it. I never make purchases on gear because of a name, title, or generalization. Seeing this outbreak of "gospel" gear is kinda dumb to me though. It's cool to recognize the genre and the players, but every drummer's needs is different and shouldn't be boxed into a category like everything in the category is guaranteed to work for all those who play that genre of music. Idk....

I'm with you min. I play what works for the job and what feels comfortable to me...

Offline SabianKnight

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2009, 02:48:18 PM »
Currently these "gospel" labeled products have not actually addressed any needs nor innovations of the genre. In fact the genre itself borrows from others genres so much that it's sonic and physical needs are for the most part undefined. Most urban "gospel" churches are storefront in nature with little to no budgets and non-tech oriented mostly self-taught players whom lack understanding or the cares of what is the "right equipment".

Culturally (here comes a stereo-typical broad statement...) we like a fat bottom lows that punch and a mid-range that is muddied by licks from 3 right handed keyboardists and an organ. This is not enough to define the needs of the musical landscape.

Drummers whom cannot tune a kit and break cymbals like breathing cannot define the equipment needs of the musical landscape accurately. Once properly educated in gear and application then presented with example a true addressing of the needs may prove fruitful.

Example of the confusion that exists now:
A church with little to now acoustic tile, carpet nor padded seating then drapery and floor to ceiling glass windows on three sides (because it use to be a clothing store) is a terrible place to generalize drum needs. The keys , bass and organ are amped. The drums are fronted by plexiglass and placed in a corner or against a back wall.
This type of situation does not give you a way of isolating sound so all the tuning will be off unless electronic tuners are used every song. the air conditioner will alter the instrument response cause the instruments to loose tuning easily and the volume is double because of all the reflecting hard surfaces. A company cannot accurately address these needs without experiencing them. And the customer cannot ask for a need that they don't know that they have.

Solution (drums): small jazz kit, 10x6.5", 12x7" 14"x6.5" snare, 14x14" floor on legs, 20" kick. Mic the kick (D6, D112, PG, etc)and two overheads... acoustic tile on the wall behind the drums, headphone monitor and remove the plexi-glass or use a short 4ft piece however a 3ft padded wood barrier would be better. Thin, dry cymbals (tight lathing and or hand hammering with small bells). Nylon Rutes, brushes, broom stick, maple drum sticks with elongated tip. Wood hoops on the snare.
[all these things promote full sound with low volume  thereby not hindering the player nor the atmospheric needs: quick, full speak - short sustain]

This comes from serious gear study, experience with gear application, and wisdom. This is not the investment of these companies. And the solution I described is not a "gospel" setup it is a professional acoustic jazz setup used for a convention of wedding band in most usage. So if we look at the product offering we see that there is nothing new for the "gospel" drummer.

Learn your craft....
Try not to become a person of success but rather a person of VALUE. - T. Harv Eker

Offline fLaT-fIfTh

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #11 on: July 12, 2009, 03:42:13 PM »
Currently these "gospel" labeled products have not actually addressed any needs nor innovations of the genre. In fact the genre itself borrows from others genres so much that it's sonic and physical needs are for the most part undefined. Most urban "gospel" churches are storefront in nature with little to no budgets and non-tech oriented mostly self-taught players whom lack understanding or the cares of what is the "right equipment".

Culturally (here comes a stereo-typical broad statement...) we like a fat bottom lows that punch and a mid-range that is muddied by licks from 3 right handed keyboardists and an organ. This is not enough to define the needs of the musical landscape.

Drummers whom cannot tune a kit and break cymbals like breathing cannot define the equipment needs of the musical landscape accurately. Once properly educated in gear and application then presented with example a true addressing of the needs may prove fruitful.

Example of the confusion that exists now:
A church with little to now acoustic tile, carpet nor padded seating then drapery and floor to ceiling glass windows on three sides (because it use to be a clothing store) is a terrible place to generalize drum needs. The keys , bass and organ are amped. The drums are fronted by plexiglass and placed in a corner or against a back wall.
This type of situation does not give you a way of isolating sound so all the tuning will be off unless electronic tuners are used every song. the air conditioner will alter the instrument response cause the instruments to loose tuning easily and the volume is double because of all the reflecting hard surfaces. A company cannot accurately address these needs without experiencing them. And the customer cannot ask for a need that they don't know that they have.

Solution (drums): small jazz kit, 10x6.5", 12x7" 14"x6.5" snare, 14x14" floor on legs, 20" kick. Mic the kick (D6, D112, PG, etc)and two overheads... acoustic tile on the wall behind the drums, headphone monitor and remove the plexi-glass or use a short 4ft piece however a 3ft padded wood barrier would be better. Thin, dry cymbals (tight lathing and or hand hammering with small bells). Nylon Rutes, brushes, broom stick, maple drum sticks with elongated tip. Wood hoops on the snare.
[all these things promote full sound with low volume  thereby not hindering the player nor the atmospheric needs: quick, full speak - short sustain]

This comes from serious gear study, experience with gear application, and wisdom. This is not the investment of these companies. And the solution I described is not a "gospel" setup it is a professional acoustic jazz setup used for a convention of wedding band in most usage. So if we look at the product offering we see that there is nothing new for the "gospel" drummer.

Learn your craft....

epic... I'm ready to take communion after that.

God bless ;)

Offline BEATBOXERZ

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Re: "Gospel" Gear
« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2009, 10:15:33 PM »
Currently these "gospel" labeled products have not actually addressed any needs nor innovations of the genre. In fact the genre itself borrows from others genres so much that it's sonic and physical needs are for the most part undefined. Most urban "gospel" churches are storefront in nature with little to no budgets and non-tech oriented mostly self-taught players whom lack understanding or the cares of what is the "right equipment".

Culturally (here comes a stereo-typical broad statement...) we like a fat bottom lows that punch and a mid-range that is muddied by licks from 3 right handed keyboardists and an organ. This is not enough to define the needs of the musical landscape.

Drummers whom cannot tune a kit and break cymbals like breathing cannot define the equipment needs of the musical landscape accurately. Once properly educated in gear and application then presented with example a true addressing of the needs may prove fruitful.

Example of the confusion that exists now:
A church with little to now acoustic tile, carpet nor padded seating then drapery and floor to ceiling glass windows on three sides (because it use to be a clothing store) is a terrible place to generalize drum needs. The keys , bass and organ are amped. The drums are fronted by plexiglass and placed in a corner or against a back wall.
This type of situation does not give you a way of isolating sound so all the tuning will be off unless electronic tuners are used every song. the air conditioner will alter the instrument response cause the instruments to loose tuning easily and the volume is double because of all the reflecting hard surfaces. A company cannot accurately address these needs without experiencing them. And the customer cannot ask for a need that they don't know that they have.

Solution (drums): small jazz kit, 10x6.5", 12x7" 14"x6.5" snare, 14x14" floor on legs, 20" kick. Mic the kick (D6, D112, PG, etc)and two overheads... acoustic tile on the wall behind the drums, headphone monitor and remove the plexi-glass or use a short 4ft piece however a 3ft padded wood barrier would be better. Thin, dry cymbals (tight lathing and or hand hammering with small bells). Nylon Rutes, brushes, broom stick, maple drum sticks with elongated tip. Wood hoops on the snare.
[all these things promote full sound with low volume  thereby not hindering the player nor the atmospheric needs: quick, full speak - short sustain]

This comes from serious gear study, experience with gear application, and wisdom. This is not the investment of these companies. And the solution I described is not a "gospel" setup it is a professional acoustic jazz setup used for a convention of wedding band in most usage. So if we look at the product offering we see that there is nothing new for the "gospel" drummer.

Learn your craft....

 :)Good word SK!
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