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Author Topic: beyond the root help  (Read 1009 times)

Offline foreverbless

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beyond the root help
« on: March 06, 2010, 05:48:29 PM »
what are some ideas to expand  on just playing the root of a note i just keep playing root notes starting to sound boring

Offline dhagler

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Re: beyond the root help
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2010, 06:33:27 PM »
what are some ideas to expand  on just playing the root of a note i just keep playing root notes starting to sound boring

In my response I am assuming you know the number system:

If the progression of the song goes from the 1 to the 4 you can always walk up (1-2-3-4). Or if you prefer to play the low 4 you can walk down (1-6-5-4).

If the song goes from the 1 to the 5 you have the same two options: up (1-3-4-5) or down (1-7-6-5).

Here's one that I use in the 1-6-2-5:

1-(7)-6-(1)-2-(6)-5-(7)-1

or

1-(3)-6-(5)-2-(3)-5-(2)-1

Offline kevmove02

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Re: beyond the root help
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2010, 07:45:57 AM »
To expand on what dhagler said, understanding your intervals go a long way towards building great basslines. If you practice playing chords and arpeggios around the circle of fifths, you will start to hear what notes sound sound good when played in sequence. Then its just a matter of developing good patterns. For example, it is common to play these patterns:

Root - 5th
Root - 5th - Octave
Root - 3rd - 5th
Root - 3rd - 5th - octave

You could mix it up by playing root - 5th - 3rd - octave or root - octave - 5th and so on. Or you could stick with the root and focus on rhythm by playing along with the snare drum, kick drum or even the hi hat! FYI: On the song, "Everyday People" by Sly and the Family Stone, bassist Larry Graham played one note for the ENTIRE song. As James Brown once said, "Make It Funky!"

This is why you should practice playing scales and chords around the circle of fifths/fourths, identifying the scale degrees as you go. Do a search of this forum, looking for scales or modes or progressions.

Understanding this stuff is why they call it "the woodshed", but it is completely worth the effort it takes to master it.
 

Offline foreverbless

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Re: beyond the root help
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2010, 08:57:07 PM »
thankx a lot

Offline waveofthinking

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Re: beyond the root help
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2010, 09:08:03 PM »
what are some ideas to expand  on just playing the root of a note i just keep playing root notes starting to sound boring

Some other good things to look into are blues and jazzy theory books/videos.
"When the pupil is ready, the master will appear".

Offline mjl422

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Re: beyond the root help
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2010, 01:22:42 PM »
Don't forget your ghost notes.  Sometimes you can make song feel a certain without playing a bunch of notes.  This sort goes along with what kevmove20 posted. 

Offline kevmove02

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Re: beyond the root help
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2010, 09:46:06 AM »
Once you know the various chord structures, you should listen to a song that you know the chord progression, and analyze the way the bass player articulates the notes. You should begin to sense that the bass is played as both a groove instrument and harmonic instrument at the same time. When we use muting, slap and pop and other percussion techniques, we create the momentum in the song that either energizes or calms the mood. For example, study the "shout run". The drummer establishes a steady beat alternating bass drum/snare drum hits, with a sprinkling of fills. The bassist has the power to move the groove through the repeating chromatic runs that can move up or down an octave. But what elevates the groove is the accenting of the notes, use of hammer ons and pull offs, plucking with your thumb and so on. Done properly, the bassist liberates the rest of the band to really jam (even the drummer). People really don't know, but they will.

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