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Author Topic: Slash Chords???  (Read 3851 times)

Offline trackman

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Slash Chords???
« on: January 11, 2008, 05:22:39 AM »
This is a question about Dave's video "You Are Good". Some of the chords are things like: A/E, B/E and then later they are C/A, D/A and the like (may not be the actual chords). My question is this: When this happens, is this a change in key or just a part of the chord progressions of the song?

This is one of those eye opening moments of understanding potentially so someone please help! :D
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Offline gtrdave

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Re: Slash Chords???
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2008, 08:38:05 AM »
A slash chord is nothing more than a chord with an alternate bass note.
They're also called compound chords.

When you see a chord like A/E, the first character is the chord and the second character after the slash is the bass note, so A/E would be an A chord with an E bass note instead of an A bass note.

Some of the most common types of slash chords are inversion based, meaning that one of the notes already in the chord triad are used for the bass note.
G/B, D/F#, A/C#, A/E...all are inversions of the chord but using either the 3rd note of the 5th note as the bass note instead of the root note.

Some slash chords are non-inversion based, like B/E. The B triad is B, D#, F#...there's no E there BUT if you add extensions to the triad to make, say, a BMaj9/E, then you've got B, D# and F# as well as C# and E so BMaj9/E becomes inversion based.
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Offline Rown

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Re: Slash Chords???
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2008, 10:20:46 AM »
            DAVE,LOVE THOSE SLASH CHORDS ?/?
     Playing solo yea,in a band,let the BASS player TAKE CARE OF IT. ;)
                                 Right Dave ?/?

Offline trackman

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Re: Slash Chords???
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2008, 12:23:21 PM »
A slash chord is nothing more than a chord with an alternate bass note.
They're also called compound chords.

When you see a chord like A/E, the first character is the chord and the second character after the slash is the bass note, so A/E would be an A chord with an E bass note instead of an A bass note.

Some of the most common types of slash chords are inversion based, meaning that one of the notes already in the chord triad are used for the bass note.
G/B, D/F#, A/C#, A/E...all are inversions of the chord but using either the 3rd note of the 5th note as the bass note instead of the root note.

Some slash chords are non-inversion based, like B/E. The B triad is B, D#, F#...there's no E there BUT if you add extensions to the triad to make, say, a BMaj9/E, then you've got B, D# and F# as well as C# and E so BMaj9/E becomes inversion based.

So let me see if I have this right. In you video Dave, you went from one group of slash chords (A/E, etc...) to another set of slash chords (D/A, etc...), your chord progression is still in the same key and the bass note is added just for flavor? Just to add fullness to the sound?

The lights are slowly coming on... I think! LOL!!!  ::)
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Offline funkStrat_97

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Re: Slash Chords???
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2008, 01:08:12 PM »
            DAVE,LOVE THOSE SLASH CHORDS ?/?
     Playing solo yea,in a band,let the BASS player TAKE CARE OF IT. ;)
                                 Right Dave ?/?

That's what I usually do with all of my chords.  Let the bass player and keys take care of the root.  But there are times when it sounds better or adds soemthing to the mix to play the whole chord.  I find this particularly the case when playing distorted rhythms.  Playing roots and fifths add to the overall "heaviness" of the sound.
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Offline gtrdave

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Re: Slash Chords???
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2008, 01:43:30 PM »
So let me see if I have this right. In you video Dave, you went from one group of slash chords (A/E, etc...) to another set of slash chords (D/A, etc...), your chord progression is still in the same key and the bass note is added just for flavor? Just to add fullness to the sound?

The lights are slowly coming on... I think! LOL!!!  ::)

Yes, it's all in the same key. E.
The bass note rides the E to give a steady foundation to the sound under the moving chord triads.
It's not something anyone has to do, it's just another thing to do.
Music theory is not always music reality.
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