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Author Topic: Explaining Progressions Part 2 re-do  (Read 2431 times)

Offline T-Block

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Explaining Progressions Part 2 re-do
« on: November 08, 2011, 10:57:42 AM »
Explaining Progressions Part 2

In order to have a good, strong sounding progression, you should stay as close to the progression ZIP CODE as possible, which is 3-6-2-5-1. The reason why is because each note moves in 4ths, creating a strong pull (desire to resolve) from chord to chord. The 3 leads to 6, which leads to 2, which leads to 5, which gets you right back home to 1. Studying the circle of 4ths (circle of 5ths backwards) will help with learning the ZIP CODE in any key. Here is an illustration of the circle of 4ths:

Circle of 4ths     
C/B#
F/E#
Bb/A#
Eb/D#
Ab/G#
Db/C#
Gb/F#
Cb/B
E/Fb
A
D
G

So, let’s practice the musical ZIP CODE using the keys D, F#, and Ab:

          Key D          Key F#          Key Ab

3:         F#                A#                  C
6:         B                  D#                  F
2:         E                  G#                 Bb
5:         A                  C#                 Eb
1:         D                  F#                 Ab

Now, go back and compare these answers with the circle of 4ths. If you follow it correctly, you should be able to pick one note, then go to the circle and find everything else that follows. There are so many ways you can practice this. Here are some examples:

          Key ?         Key ?       Key ?        Key ?

3:         ?                B             ?                ?
6:         ?                ?             ?               Ab
2:         F                ?             ?                ?
5:         ?                ?            F#               ?
1:         ?                ?             ?                 ?


Just go to the circle and fill-in the blanks to find the key. Answers:

          Key Eb          Key G       Key B         Key Cb

3:         G                  B              D#              Eb
6:         C                  E              G#              Ab
2:         F                  A              C#               Db
5:         Bb                D              F#               Gb
1:         Eb                G               B                Cb


Pretty cool huh? I suggest practicing this for every key to get a feel for it. Pay attention to the sound as you go from chord to chord.

I just got one more thing to add to part 1 of this lesson. The original musical ZIP CODE is 3-6-2-5-1. However, in the major scale there are seven scale degrees (as far as progressions are concerned). So, what I did was add in the other two scale degrees to make my own musical ZIP CODE:  (7)-3-6-2-5-1-(4)  So, here’s a list using my zip code for every key:

Key C: (B)-E-A-D-G-C-(F)

Key C#: (B#)-E#-A#-D#-G#-C#-(F#)
Key Db: (C)-F-Bb-Eb-Ab-Db-(Gb)

Key D: (C#)-F#-B-E-A-D-(G)

Key Eb: (D)-G-C-F-Bb-Eb-(Ab)

Key E: (D#)-G#-C#-F#-B-E-(A)

Key F: (E)-A-D-G-C-F-(Bb)

Key F#: (E#)-A#-D#-G#-C#-F#-(B)
Key Gb: (F)-Bb-Eb-Ab-Db-Gb-(Cb)

Key G: (F#)-B-E-A-D-G-(C)

Key Ab: (G)-C-F-Bb-Eb-Ab-(Db)

Key A: (G#)-C#-F#-B-E-A-(D)

Key Bb: (A)-D-G-C-F-Bb-(Eb)

Key B: (A#)-D#-G#-C#-F#-B-(E)
Key Cb: (Bb)-Eb-Ab-Db-Gb-Cb-(Fb)
Real musicians play in every key!!!
Music Theory, da numbers work!

Offline T-Block

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Re: Explaining Progressions Part 2 re-do
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2011, 11:00:26 AM »
Now, if you have been following my previous posts on progressions, then you should know what these numbers represent in a progression. In case you have forgotten, let me refresh your memory. These numbers (scale degrees) represent the left hand or bass notes of a progression. The question now becomes, what in the world do you play in the right hand? Again, from previous posts, I suggested that you start with scale degree chords:

1 chord = major (1-3-5)
2 chord = minor (2-4-6)
3 chord = minor (3-5-7)
4 chord = major (4-6-1)
5 chord = major (5-7-2)
6 chord = minor (6-1-3)
7 chord = diminished (7-2-4)

For some people, that is enough to get by. However, there comes (may come) a point when just using these basic chords gets (will get) “boring”, and there is an urge to want to “spice it up” with different chords. Then, the question becomes how to do it.

Believe it or not, there is a way to use just these seven chords to spice up your playing. What you do is mix-n-match the chords with different bass notes. For example, instead of playing a 1 chord with 1 in the bass, play a 1 chord with a 3 in the bass:

1 / 1 chord  -->  3 / 1 chord

Normally, I would suggest you practice and experiment with different combinations on your own. However, I’ve decided to put together a list of chords that I’ve found that work well with each bass note to help out. First, I will list the scale degree chords I feel work best, then I will list some altered (phat) chords. I will use the Key of C to illustrate. Before I do, here’s a reminder of the scale degree chords for the Key of C:

1 chord = C-E-G
2 chord = D-F-A
3 chord = E-G-B
4 chord = F-A-C
5 chord = G-B-D
6 chord = A-C-E
7 chord = B-D-F
Real musicians play in every key!!!
Music Theory, da numbers work!

Offline T-Block

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Re: Explaining Progressions Part 2 re-do
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2011, 11:05:23 AM »
1 in the LH/bass

When there is a 1 being played in the bass, just about any scale degree chord can go with it. The ones I feel work the best are the: 1 chord, 2 chord, 3 chord, 4 chord, and 5 chord

C / C-E-G (C)
C / D-F-A (Dm/C)
C / E-G-B  (CM7)
C / F-A-C  (F/C)
C / G-B-D  (G/C)

Here are some altered chords that go good with 1 in the bass:

C / C-D-E-G  *altered 1 chord in the RH; Cadd9

C / C-D-G  *altered 1 chord in the RH; Cadd2 or C2

C / C-F-G  *altered 1 chord in the RH; Csus4

C / C-G  *altered 1 chord in the RH; C5 (also called a power chord)

C / C-E-G-Bb  *altered 1 chord in the RH; C7

C / Bb-E-A-C *altered 1 chord in the RH; C13

C / Ab-C-D-F  *altered 2 chord in the RH; Dm7(b5)/C

C / D-F#-A *altered 2 chord in the RH (also a secondary dominant chord); D major in RH, together with the LH forms a D7; D/C

C / G-Bb-D-F *altered 5 chord in the RH; Gm7 in RH; Gm7/C

C / Bb-D-F *altered 5 or 7 chord in the RH; Bb major in RH, acting as a Gm7 chord without the root or a Cm11 without the thrid; Cm11 or Bb/C



4 in the LH/bass

When there is a 4 being played in the bass, the ones I feel work the best are the: 1 chord, 4 chord, 5 chord, and 6 chord

F / C-E-G (C/F)
F / F-A-C (F)
F / G-B-D (G/F, together with the LH forms a G7, also a secondary dominant chord)
F / A-C-E

Here are some altered chords that go good with 4 in the bass:

F / Ab-C-D-F  *altered 2 chord in the RH; Dm7(b5)/F

F / F-G-A-C  *altered 4 chord in the RH; Fadd9

F / F-G-C  *altered 4 chord in the RH; Fadd2 or F2

F / F-B-C  *altered 4 chord in the RH; Fsus4

F / F-C  *altered 4 chord in the RH; F5 (also called a power chord)

F / Eb-G-A-C  *altered 4 chord in the RH; F9

F / Eb-G-A-D  *altered 4 chord in the RH; F13

F / Bb-D-F *altered 5 or 7 chord in the RH; Bb major in RH; Bb/F



7 in the LH/bass

When there is a 7 being played in the bass, the ones I feel work the best are the: 2 chord and 5 chord

B / D-F-A (Bm7 b5)
B / G-B-D (G/B)

Here are some altered chords that go good with 7 in the bass:

B / A-D-E  *altered 2 chord in the RH; Dm sus2 in RH; Bm11

B / F#-A-C#-E  *altered 2 chord without the root in the RH; F#M7 in the RH; Bm11



3 in the LH/bass

When there is a 3 being played in the bass, the ones I feel work the best are the: 3 chord, 5 chord, and 7 chord

E / E-G-B (Em)
E / G-B-D (G/B)
E / B-D-F (Em7 b9, no third)

Here are some altered chords that go good with 3 in the bass:

E / E-G#-B-D  *altered 3 chord in RH; E7

E / G#-C-D-E  *altered 3 chord; E7 #5

E / G#-C-D-G  *altered 3 chord; E7 #5/#9

E / F-G#-B-D  *altered 5 or 7 chord in the RH; G#dim7 in the RH; E7 b9



6 in the LH/bass

When there is a 6 being played in the bass, the ones I feel work the best are the: 1 chord, 3 chord, 4 chord, 5 chord, and 6 chord

A / C-E-G (Am7)
A / E-G-B  (Em/A)
A / F-A-C  (F/A)
A / G-B-D  (G/A)
A / A-C-E (Am)

Here are some altered chords that go good with 1 in the bass:

A / G-B-C-E  *altered 1 chord in the RH; CM7 in RH; Am9

A / G-Bb-C#-E  *altered 1 or 3 chord in the RH; C#dim7 or Edim7 in RH; A7 b9

A / B-C-D-G *altered 1 or 5 chord in the RH; Am11



2 in the LH/bass

When there is a 2 being played in the bass, the ones I feel work the best are the: 2 chord, 4 chord, and 6 chord

D / D-F-A (Dm)
D / F-A-C (Dm7)
D / A-C-E (Am/D)

Here are some altered chords that go good with 2 in the bass:

D / F#-A-C-E  *altered 2 or 4 chord in the RH; F#m7 b5 in RH; D9

D / F#-A-C-Eb  *altered 4 or 6 chord in the RH; F#dim7 or Adim7 in RH; D7 b9

D / E-G#-B  *altered 3 chord in the RH; E major in RH, also a secondary dominant; E/D

D / A-C-E-G  *altered 6 chord in the RH; Am7 in RH; Am7/D or D11 without the third



5 in the LH/bass

When there is a 5 being played in the bass, the ones I feel work the best are the: 1 chord, 4 chord, 5 chord, and 7 chord

G / C-E-G (C/G)
G / F-A-C  (F/G)
G / G-B-D  (G)
G / B-D-F (G7)

Here are some altered chords that go good with 5 in the bass:

G / F-A-C-E  *altered 4 chord in the RH; FM7 in RH; FM7/G

G / G-A-B-D  *altered 5 chord in the RH; Gadd9

G / G-A-D  *altered 5 chord in the RH; Gadd2 or G2

G / G-C-D  *altered 5 chord in the RH; Gsus4

G / G-D  *altered 5 chord in the RH; G5 (also called a power chord)

G / F-G-C-D  *altered 5 chord in the RH; G7sus4

G / F-G-B-D#  *altered 5 chord in the RH; G7 #5

G / B-D#-F-A#  *altered 5 chord in the RH; G7 #5/#9

G / F-B-E-G *altered 5 chord in the RH; G13

G / F-G#-B-D *altered 5 or 7 chord in the RH; G#dim7 or Bdim7 in RH; G7 b9
Real musicians play in every key!!!
Music Theory, da numbers work!
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